Tag: Writer

What Makes a Writer a Writer?

Sissinghurst Castle and Garden - The Famous White Garden

An interesting discussion on LinkedIn is swirling around the topic of when a writer can call themselves a writer .. As I've watched the discussion unfold, some interesting ideas have cropped up. They are worth considering.

A writer is someone who has been published offline.

Considering that a large segment of the writing work available is almost exclusively online today, this definition just can not hold true. While it is almost guaranteed that someone who has broken into hard print is a very good writer, it does not preclude someone who has never had their work published in traditional media from being considered a writer.

A writer is someone who knows their grammar, punctuation rules and how to spell things correctly.

I'm not prepared to say this is true because I know that publishers, magazines and newspapers all hire copy editors for one very good reason. Not every writer on the team has good spelling skills. No writer's punctuation skills are perfect. And everyone has certain words they almost always type incorrectly. I've been a copy editor. It's always easier to see others mistakes.

For me, I have to watch dropping the "r" on your, adding a "d" in college and several other persistent misspellings. There are words I consistently add extra letters to and others I drop letters from almost every time I type them. And most of the time, they are words, so spell check does not catch them.

At the same time, if a writer can not tell the difference between when to use your and you're or its and it's, it will be an obstacle to achieving a higher pays scale. Excellence in every aspect of writing is essential if you want to be taken seriously.

A writer is a professional who makes a consistent income from writing.

This can be true. The definition of consistent may vary. I know that I began by approaching only a few hundred dollars a month from writing work. I had some months where I had no income from that source. At the same time, I was consistently seeking work. As a writing professional I took action.

  • I actively built my portfolio.
  • I built a free website on Office Live.
  • I focused on bridging the gap from when I studied journalism to what the market demands of writers today.
  • I applied every piece of knowledge I gained into strengthening my ability to write compelling materials.

To put the title "writer" on a resume, suggest you need to be more than someone who has started their own blog. Despite the fact that I have a ghostwriting tips blog, it is not this blog that makes me a writer. It's the fact that people read this blog and actually benefit from it that supports my claim that I am a writer.

A writer is someone who can explain different topics in language that the average person can understand.

This truly is a skill that not everyone possesses. In some ways, every writer needs to have a teacher's heart, the ability to break things down into understandable packages. Some writers are gifted with the ability to reach very young minds. That's why there are writers of children's books. Other writers just can not get down to that level, yet remain effective writers for a different audience.

A writer is more than someone who starts their own blog.

There are good blogs and so-so blogs. To truly claim to be a writer, the blog can not be riddled with grammar errors. A few spelling and punctuation errors are forgivable, especially as most blog writers can not afford a separate set of eyes to edit their work.

A writer is someone who crafts words to influence others.

It's the power to dig into the meaning of words and craft them as you have done that signifies a writer. The fact that you can express your arguments succinctly using words in their written form defines that you are a writer. Maybe that is the definition we should be holding to here. "A writer is someone who can write with words so effectively they can influence others whether they do it for pay or not."

It's not whether your work appears on the eviscerated remnants of a tree or on the electronic representation of a page that makes you a writer. It's whether your words move and / or motivate. A novelist may move through the creation of characters and plots. A web writer may motivate to action by carefully chosen words.

Both are writers. Both use their power over words to create an experience in the mind. That experience would not be there without the writer's ability to craft words.

What makes a writer a writer? We'll probably never be able to agree on a single definition. Too may people would disagree with the writer's version of the artist's definition, "A writer is a writer because he / she writes."

What Makes a Writer a Writer?

Miss Virtual World Writer Inspiration Challenge - Screenwriter: Charlie Chaplin

An interesting discussion on LinkedIn is swirling around the topic of when a writer can call themselves a writer .. As I've watched the discussion unfold, some interesting ideas have cropped up. They are worth considering.

A writer is someone who has been published offline.

Considering that a large segment of the writing work available is almost exclusively online today, this definition just can not hold true. While it is almost guaranteed that someone who has broken into hard print is a very good writer, it does not preclude someone who has never had their work published in traditional media from being considered a writer.

A writer is someone who knows their grammar, punctuation rules and how to spell things correctly.

I'm not prepared to say this is true because I know that publishers, magazines and newspapers all hire copy editors for one very good reason. Not every writer on the team has good spelling skills. No writer's punctuation skills are perfect. And everyone has certain words they almost always type incorrectly. I've been a copy editor. It's always easier to see others mistakes.

For me, I have to watch dropping the "r" on your, adding a "d" in college and several other persistent misspellings. There are words I consistently add extra letters to and others I drop letters from almost every time I type them. And most of the time, they are words, so spell check does not catch them.

At the same time, if a writer can not tell the difference between when to use your and you're or its and it's, it will be an obstacle to achieving a higher pays scale. Excellence in every aspect of writing is essential if you want to be taken seriously.

A writer is a professional who makes a consistent income from writing.

This can be true. The definition of consistent may vary. I know that I began by approaching only a few hundred dollars a month from writing work. I had some months where I had no income from that source. At the same time, I was consistently seeking work. As a writing professional I took action.

  • I actively built my portfolio.
  • I built a free website on Office Live.
  • I focused on bridging the gap from when I studied journalism to what the market demands of writers today.
  • I applied every piece of knowledge I gained into strengthening my ability to write compelling materials.

To put the title "writer" on a resume, suggest you need to be more than someone who has started their own blog. Despite the fact that I have a ghostwriting tips blog, it is not this blog that makes me a writer. It's the fact that people read this blog and actually benefit from it that supports my claim that I am a writer.

A writer is someone who can explain different topics in language that the average person can understand.

This truly is a skill that not everyone possesses. In some ways, every writer needs to have a teacher's heart, the ability to break things down into understandable packages. Some writers are gifted with the ability to reach very young minds. That's why there are writers of children's books. Other writers just can not get down to that level, yet remain effective writers for a different audience.

A writer is more than someone who starts their own blog.

There are good blogs and so-so blogs. To truly claim to be a writer, the blog can not be riddled with grammar errors. A few spelling and punctuation errors are forgivable, especially as most blog writers can not afford a separate set of eyes to edit their work.

A writer is someone who crafts words to influence others.

It's the power to dig into the meaning of words and craft them as you have done that signifies a writer. The fact that you can express your arguments succinctly using words in their written form defines that you are a writer. Maybe that is the definition we should be holding to here. "A writer is someone who can write with words so effectively they can influence others whether they do it for pay or not."

It's not whether your work appears on the eviscerated remnants of a tree or on the electronic representation of a page that makes you a writer. It's whether your words move and / or motivate. A novelist may move through the creation of characters and plots. A web writer may motivate to action by carefully chosen words.

Both are writers. Both use their power over words to create an experience in the mind. That experience would not be there without the writer's ability to craft words.

What makes a writer a writer? We'll probably never be able to agree on a single definition. Too may people would disagree with the writer's version of the artist's definition, "A writer is a writer because he / she writes."

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How Do I Become a Freelance Writer?

Il mare dei Malavoglia

Once the learning potential of freelance writers becomes apparent, many people will ask themselves, "How do I become a freelance writer?" The process can be as hard or as easy as you want to make it. Like any process, you have to have a reasonable idea of ​​what the final product is and the ingredients or steps along the way to achieving it.

If you give some thought to how many different types of writers there are, you will see that you have discovered the first step along the way to becoming one.

What sort of writer can you be?

This is probably the most crucial question that you will ask yourself. Answer that question wrong and everything you attempt in order to achieve your aim will be wasted.

So, how many types of writers are there? Even a cursory glance will expose quite a list – reporters, poets, story tellers, reviewers, advertising copy writers, article writers, to mention a few. The secret is to look at your own writing style and the work that you have already produced and compare it with what has been published by other writers.

Have you reported on local events? Many people have their own blogs nowdays and do write such reports. Do you? Do you belong to a local poetry circle and see your own work enthusiastically received? Do you think that your work compares favorably with that of your peers?

Whatever sort of writer you want to be, you must already have produced an amount of work that would justify your choice. There is no point at all, for example, in setting out to be a poet if you have never written a poem before and let someone else judge it. You may think that you are the best poet in the world but if nobody else who sees your work agreements with you. You see the point?

Once you are confident that you are the type of writer that you want to be you should get together some samples of your work and assemble a small portfolio. With the advent of the internet it is now fairly easy to submit your portfolio to a wide selection of potential hirers of freelance writers – the problem is getting them to read it!

The very first step in trying to ensure that your portfolio will be looked at is to make sure you know who to send it to. It is not too difficult to discover the person's name and email address, after all, it is part their job to discover new writers to keep the publication fresh and interesting.

Once you know who to send it to, you need to compose a simple message that will introduce yourself in as few words as possible and ask them to look at your work on the understanding that you would like to be considered as a future freelance contributor.

If your work is to a reasonable standard and relevant to the content that is normally included in the publication, you will be considered and probably invited for an interview and, possibly, a trial period.

Although you will only be paid for your work that is published, a trial period will not only confirm your position, if successful, but will also confirm that you have made the right choice.

No Comments

Categories: Famous

Tags:

What Makes a Writer a Writer?

Underwater Boating :)

An interesting discussion on LinkedIn is swirling around the topic of when a writer can call themselves a writer .. As I've watched the discussion unfold, some interesting ideas have cropped up. They are worth considering.

A writer is someone who has been published offline.

Considering that a large segment of the writing work available is almost exclusively online today, this definition just can not hold true. While it is almost guaranteed that someone who has broken into hard print is a very good writer, it does not preclude someone who has never had their work published in traditional media from being considered a writer.

A writer is someone who knows their grammar, punctuation rules and how to spell things correctly.

I'm not prepared to say this is true because I know that publishers, magazines and newspapers all hire copy editors for one very good reason. Not every writer on the team has good spelling skills. No writer's punctuation skills are perfect. And everyone has certain words they almost always type incorrectly. I've been a copy editor. It's always easier to see others mistakes.

For me, I have to watch dropping the "r" on your, adding a "d" in college and several other persistent misspellings. There are words I consistently add extra letters to and others I drop letters from almost every time I type them. And most of the time, they are words, so spell check does not catch them.

At the same time, if a writer can not tell the difference between when to use your and you're or its and it's, it will be an obstacle to achieving a higher pays scale. Excellence in every aspect of writing is essential if you want to be taken seriously.

A writer is a professional who makes a consistent income from writing.

This can be true. The definition of consistent may vary. I know that I began by approaching only a few hundred dollars a month from writing work. I had some months where I had no income from that source. At the same time, I was consistently seeking work. As a writing professional I took action.

  • I actively built my portfolio.
  • I built a free website on Office Live.
  • I focused on bridging the gap from when I studied journalism to what the market demands of writers today.
  • I applied every piece of knowledge I gained into strengthening my ability to write compelling materials.

To put the title "writer" on a resume, suggest you need to be more than someone who has started their own blog. Despite the fact that I have a ghostwriting tips blog, it is not this blog that makes me a writer. It's the fact that people read this blog and actually benefit from it that supports my claim that I am a writer.

A writer is someone who can explain different topics in language that the average person can understand.

This truly is a skill that not everyone possesses. In some ways, every writer needs to have a teacher's heart, the ability to break things down into understandable packages. Some writers are gifted with the ability to reach very young minds. That's why there are writers of children's books. Other writers just can not get down to that level, yet remain effective writers for a different audience.

A writer is more than someone who starts their own blog.

There are good blogs and so-so blogs. To truly claim to be a writer, the blog can not be riddled with grammar errors. A few spelling and punctuation errors are forgivable, especially as most blog writers can not afford a separate set of eyes to edit their work.

A writer is someone who crafts words to influence others.

It's the power to dig into the meaning of words and craft them as you have done that signifies a writer. The fact that you can express your arguments succinctly using words in their written form defines that you are a writer. Maybe that is the definition we should be holding to here. "A writer is someone who can write with words so effectively they can influence others whether they do it for pay or not."

It's not whether your work appears on the eviscerated remnants of a tree or on the electronic representation of a page that makes you a writer. It's whether your words move and / or motivate. A novelist may move through the creation of characters and plots. A web writer may motivate to action by carefully chosen words.

Both are writers. Both use their power over words to create an experience in the mind. That experience would not be there without the writer's ability to craft words.

What makes a writer a writer? We'll probably never be able to agree on a single definition. Too may people would disagree with the writer's version of the artist's definition, "A writer is a writer because he / she writes."

How Do I Become a Freelance Writer?

Belem Tower

Once the learning potential of freelance writers becomes apparent, many people will ask themselves, "How do I become a freelance writer?" The process can be as hard or as easy as you want to make it. Like any process, you have to have a reasonable idea of ​​what the final product is and the ingredients or steps along the way to achieving it.

If you give some thought to how many different types of writers there are, you will see that you have discovered the first step along the way to becoming one.

What sort of writer can you be?

This is probably the most crucial question that you will ask yourself. Answer that question wrong and everything you attempt in order to achieve your aim will be wasted.

So, how many types of writers are there? Even a cursory glance will expose quite a list – reporters, poets, story tellers, reviewers, advertising copy writers, article writers, to mention a few. The secret is to look at your own writing style and the work that you have already produced and compare it with what has been published by other writers.

Have you reported on local events? Many people have their own blogs nowdays and do write such reports. Do you? Do you belong to a local poetry circle and see your own work enthusiastically received? Do you think that your work compares favorably with that of your peers?

Whatever sort of writer you want to be, you must already have produced an amount of work that would justify your choice. There is no point at all, for example, in setting out to be a poet if you have never written a poem before and let someone else judge it. You may think that you are the best poet in the world but if nobody else who sees your work agreements with you. You see the point?

Once you are confident that you are the type of writer that you want to be you should get together some samples of your work and assemble a small portfolio. With the advent of the internet it is now fairly easy to submit your portfolio to a wide selection of potential hirers of freelance writers – the problem is getting them to read it!

The very first step in trying to ensure that your portfolio will be looked at is to make sure you know who to send it to. It is not too difficult to discover the person's name and email address, after all, it is part their job to discover new writers to keep the publication fresh and interesting.

Once you know who to send it to, you need to compose a simple message that will introduce yourself in as few words as possible and ask them to look at your work on the understanding that you would like to be considered as a future freelance contributor.

If your work is to a reasonable standard and relevant to the content that is normally included in the publication, you will be considered and probably invited for an interview and, possibly, a trial period.

Although you will only be paid for your work that is published, a trial period will not only confirm your position, if successful, but will also confirm that you have made the right choice.

What Makes a Writer a Writer?

River Wharfe - Wharfedale

An interesting discussion on LinkedIn is swirling around the topic of when a writer can call themselves a writer .. As I've watched the discussion unfold, some interesting ideas have cropped up. They are worth considering.

A writer is someone who has been published offline.

Considering that a large segment of the writing work available is almost exclusively online today, this definition just can not hold true. While it is almost guaranteed that someone who has broken into hard print is a very good writer, it does not preclude someone who has never had their work published in traditional media from being considered a writer.

A writer is someone who knows their grammar, punctuation rules and how to spell things correctly.

I'm not prepared to say this is true because I know that publishers, magazines and newspapers all hire copy editors for one very good reason. Not every writer on the team has good spelling skills. No writer's punctuation skills are perfect. And everyone has certain words they almost always type incorrectly. I've been a copy editor. It's always easier to see others mistakes.

For me, I have to watch dropping the "r" on your, adding a "d" in college and several other persistent misspellings. There are words I consistently add extra letters to and others I drop letters from almost every time I type them. And most of the time, they are words, so spell check does not catch them.

At the same time, if a writer can not tell the difference between when to use your and you're or its and it's, it will be an obstacle to achieving a higher pays scale. Excellence in every aspect of writing is essential if you want to be taken seriously.

A writer is a professional who makes a consistent income from writing.

This can be true. The definition of consistent may vary. I know that I began by approaching only a few hundred dollars a month from writing work. I had some months where I had no income from that source. At the same time, I was consistently seeking work. As a writing professional I took action.

  • I actively built my portfolio.
  • I built a free website on Office Live.
  • I focused on bridging the gap from when I studied journalism to what the market demands of writers today.
  • I applied every piece of knowledge I gained into strengthening my ability to write compelling materials.

To put the title "writer" on a resume, suggest you need to be more than someone who has started their own blog. Despite the fact that I have a ghostwriting tips blog, it is not this blog that makes me a writer. It's the fact that people read this blog and actually benefit from it that supports my claim that I am a writer.

A writer is someone who can explain different topics in language that the average person can understand.

This truly is a skill that not everyone possesses. In some ways, every writer needs to have a teacher's heart, the ability to break things down into understandable packages. Some writers are gifted with the ability to reach very young minds. That's why there are writers of children's books. Other writers just can not get down to that level, yet remain effective writers for a different audience.

A writer is more than someone who starts their own blog.

There are good blogs and so-so blogs. To truly claim to be a writer, the blog can not be riddled with grammar errors. A few spelling and punctuation errors are forgivable, especially as most blog writers can not afford a separate set of eyes to edit their work.

A writer is someone who crafts words to influence others.

It's the power to dig into the meaning of words and craft them as you have done that signifies a writer. The fact that you can express your arguments succinctly using words in their written form defines that you are a writer. Maybe that is the definition we should be holding to here. "A writer is someone who can write with words so effectively they can influence others whether they do it for pay or not."

It's not whether your work appears on the eviscerated remnants of a tree or on the electronic representation of a page that makes you a writer. It's whether your words move and / or motivate. A novelist may move through the creation of characters and plots. A web writer may motivate to action by carefully chosen words.

Both are writers. Both use their power over words to create an experience in the mind. That experience would not be there without the writer's ability to craft words.

What makes a writer a writer? We'll probably never be able to agree on a single definition. Too may people would disagree with the writer's version of the artist's definition, "A writer is a writer because he / she writes."

How Do I Become a Freelance Writer?

Abbotsford House

Once the learning potential of freelance writers becomes apparent, many people will ask themselves, "How do I become a freelance writer?" The process can be as hard or as easy as you want to make it. Like any process, you have to have a reasonable idea of ​​what the final product is and the ingredients or steps along the way to achieving it.

If you give some thought to how many different types of writers there are, you will see that you have discovered the first step along the way to becoming one.

What sort of writer can you be?

This is probably the most crucial question that you will ask yourself. Answer that question wrong and everything you attempt in order to achieve your aim will be wasted.

So, how many types of writers are there? Even a cursory glance will expose quite a list – reporters, poets, story tellers, reviewers, advertising copy writers, article writers, to mention a few. The secret is to look at your own writing style and the work that you have already produced and compare it with what has been published by other writers.

Have you reported on local events? Many people have their own blogs nowdays and do write such reports. Do you? Do you belong to a local poetry circle and see your own work enthusiastically received? Do you think that your work compares favorably with that of your peers?

Whatever sort of writer you want to be, you must already have produced an amount of work that would justify your choice. There is no point at all, for example, in setting out to be a poet if you have never written a poem before and let someone else judge it. You may think that you are the best poet in the world but if nobody else who sees your work agreements with you. You see the point?

Once you are confident that you are the type of writer that you want to be you should get together some samples of your work and assemble a small portfolio. With the advent of the internet it is now fairly easy to submit your portfolio to a wide selection of potential hirers of freelance writers – the problem is getting them to read it!

The very first step in trying to ensure that your portfolio will be looked at is to make sure you know who to send it to. It is not too difficult to discover the person's name and email address, after all, it is part their job to discover new writers to keep the publication fresh and interesting.

Once you know who to send it to, you need to compose a simple message that will introduce yourself in as few words as possible and ask them to look at your work on the understanding that you would like to be considered as a future freelance contributor.

If your work is to a reasonable standard and relevant to the content that is normally included in the publication, you will be considered and probably invited for an interview and, possibly, a trial period.

Although you will only be paid for your work that is published, a trial period will not only confirm your position, if successful, but will also confirm that you have made the right choice.

What Makes a Writer a Writer?

Grasmere

An interesting discussion on LinkedIn is swirling around the topic of when a writer can call themselves a writer .. As I've watched the discussion unfold, some interesting ideas have cropped up. They are worth considering.

A writer is someone who has been published offline.

Considering that a large segment of the writing work available is almost exclusively online today, this definition just can not hold true. While it is almost guaranteed that someone who has broken into hard print is a very good writer, it does not preclude someone who has never had their work published in traditional media from being considered a writer.

A writer is someone who knows their grammar, punctuation rules and how to spell things correctly.

I'm not prepared to say this is true because I know that publishers, magazines and newspapers all hire copy editors for one very good reason. Not every writer on the team has good spelling skills. No writer's punctuation skills are perfect. And everyone has certain words they almost always type incorrectly. I've been a copy editor. It's always easier to see others mistakes.

For me, I have to watch dropping the "r" on your, adding a "d" in college and several other persistent misspellings. There are words I consistently add extra letters to and others I drop letters from almost every time I type them. And most of the time, they are words, so spell check does not catch them.

At the same time, if a writer can not tell the difference between when to use your and you're or its and it's, it will be an obstacle to achieving a higher pays scale. Excellence in every aspect of writing is essential if you want to be taken seriously.

A writer is a professional who makes a consistent income from writing.

This can be true. The definition of consistent may vary. I know that I began by approaching only a few hundred dollars a month from writing work. I had some months where I had no income from that source. At the same time, I was consistently seeking work. As a writing professional I took action.

  • I actively built my portfolio.
  • I built a free website on Office Live.
  • I focused on bridging the gap from when I studied journalism to what the market demands of writers today.
  • I applied every piece of knowledge I gained into strengthening my ability to write compelling materials.

To put the title "writer" on a resume, suggest you need to be more than someone who has started their own blog. Despite the fact that I have a ghostwriting tips blog, it is not this blog that makes me a writer. It's the fact that people read this blog and actually benefit from it that supports my claim that I am a writer.

A writer is someone who can explain different topics in language that the average person can understand.

This truly is a skill that not everyone possesses. In some ways, every writer needs to have a teacher's heart, the ability to break things down into understandable packages. Some writers are gifted with the ability to reach very young minds. That's why there are writers of children's books. Other writers just can not get down to that level, yet remain effective writers for a different audience.

A writer is more than someone who starts their own blog.

There are good blogs and so-so blogs. To truly claim to be a writer, the blog can not be riddled with grammar errors. A few spelling and punctuation errors are forgivable, especially as most blog writers can not afford a separate set of eyes to edit their work.

A writer is someone who crafts words to influence others.

It's the power to dig into the meaning of words and craft them as you have done that signifies a writer. The fact that you can express your arguments succinctly using words in their written form defines that you are a writer. Maybe that is the definition we should be holding to here. "A writer is someone who can write with words so effectively they can influence others whether they do it for pay or not."

It's not whether your work appears on the eviscerated remnants of a tree or on the electronic representation of a page that makes you a writer. It's whether your words move and / or motivate. A novelist may move through the creation of characters and plots. A web writer may motivate to action by carefully chosen words.

Both are writers. Both use their power over words to create an experience in the mind. That experience would not be there without the writer's ability to craft words.

What makes a writer a writer? We'll probably never be able to agree on a single definition. Too may people would disagree with the writer's version of the artist's definition, "A writer is a writer because he / she writes."

How Do I Become a Freelance Writer?

Gateway to Upper Wharfedale

Once the learning potential of freelance writers becomes apparent, many people will ask themselves, "How do I become a freelance writer?" The process can be as hard or as easy as you want to make it. Like any process, you have to have a reasonable idea of ​​what the final product is and the ingredients or steps along the way to achieving it.

If you give some thought to how many different types of writers there are, you will see that you have discovered the first step along the way to becoming one.

What sort of writer can you be?

This is probably the most crucial question that you will ask yourself. Answer that question wrong and everything you attempt in order to achieve your aim will be wasted.

So, how many types of writers are there? Even a cursory glance will expose quite a list – reporters, poets, story tellers, reviewers, advertising copy writers, article writers, to mention a few. The secret is to look at your own writing style and the work that you have already produced and compare it with what has been published by other writers.

Have you reported on local events? Many people have their own blogs nowdays and do write such reports. Do you? Do you belong to a local poetry circle and see your own work enthusiastically received? Do you think that your work compares favorably with that of your peers?

Whatever sort of writer you want to be, you must already have produced an amount of work that would justify your choice. There is no point at all, for example, in setting out to be a poet if you have never written a poem before and let someone else judge it. You may think that you are the best poet in the world but if nobody else who sees your work agreements with you. You see the point?

Once you are confident that you are the type of writer that you want to be you should get together some samples of your work and assemble a small portfolio. With the advent of the internet it is now fairly easy to submit your portfolio to a wide selection of potential hirers of freelance writers – the problem is getting them to read it!

The very first step in trying to ensure that your portfolio will be looked at is to make sure you know who to send it to. It is not too difficult to discover the person's name and email address, after all, it is part their job to discover new writers to keep the publication fresh and interesting.

Once you know who to send it to, you need to compose a simple message that will introduce yourself in as few words as possible and ask them to look at your work on the understanding that you would like to be considered as a future freelance contributor.

If your work is to a reasonable standard and relevant to the content that is normally included in the publication, you will be considered and probably invited for an interview and, possibly, a trial period.

Although you will only be paid for your work that is published, a trial period will not only confirm your position, if successful, but will also confirm that you have made the right choice.

What Makes a Writer a Writer?

Golden Lane (Zlatá ulička), Prague, Czechia, June 12, 2017 264

An interesting discussion on LinkedIn is swirling around the topic of when a writer can call themselves a writer .. As I've watched the discussion unfold, some interesting ideas have cropped up. They are worth considering.

A writer is someone who has been published offline.

Considering that a large segment of the writing work available is almost exclusively online today, this definition just can not hold true. While it is almost guaranteed that someone who has broken into hard print is a very good writer, it does not preclude someone who has never had their work published in traditional media from being considered a writer.

A writer is someone who knows their grammar, punctuation rules and how to spell things correctly.

I'm not prepared to say this is true because I know that publishers, magazines and newspapers all hire copy editors for one very good reason. Not every writer on the team has good spelling skills. No writer's punctuation skills are perfect. And everyone has certain words they almost always type incorrectly. I've been a copy editor. It's always easier to see others mistakes.

For me, I have to watch dropping the "r" on your, adding a "d" in college and several other persistent misspellings. There are words I consistently add extra letters to and others I drop letters from almost every time I type them. And most of the time, they are words, so spell check does not catch them.

At the same time, if a writer can not tell the difference between when to use your and you're or its and it's, it will be an obstacle to achieving a higher pays scale. Excellence in every aspect of writing is essential if you want to be taken seriously.

A writer is a professional who makes a consistent income from writing.

This can be true. The definition of consistent may vary. I know that I began by approaching only a few hundred dollars a month from writing work. I had some months where I had no income from that source. At the same time, I was consistently seeking work. As a writing professional I took action.

  • I actively built my portfolio.
  • I built a free website on Office Live.
  • I focused on bridging the gap from when I studied journalism to what the market demands of writers today.
  • I applied every piece of knowledge I gained into strengthening my ability to write compelling materials.

To put the title "writer" on a resume, suggest you need to be more than someone who has started their own blog. Despite the fact that I have a ghostwriting tips blog, it is not this blog that makes me a writer. It's the fact that people read this blog and actually benefit from it that supports my claim that I am a writer.

A writer is someone who can explain different topics in language that the average person can understand.

This truly is a skill that not everyone possesses. In some ways, every writer needs to have a teacher's heart, the ability to break things down into understandable packages. Some writers are gifted with the ability to reach very young minds. That's why there are writers of children's books. Other writers just can not get down to that level, yet remain effective writers for a different audience.

A writer is more than someone who starts their own blog.

There are good blogs and so-so blogs. To truly claim to be a writer, the blog can not be riddled with grammar errors. A few spelling and punctuation errors are forgivable, especially as most blog writers can not afford a separate set of eyes to edit their work.

A writer is someone who crafts words to influence others.

It's the power to dig into the meaning of words and craft them as you have done that signifies a writer. The fact that you can express your arguments succinctly using words in their written form defines that you are a writer. Maybe that is the definition we should be holding to here. "A writer is someone who can write with words so effectively they can influence others whether they do it for pay or not."

It's not whether your work appears on the eviscerated remnants of a tree or on the electronic representation of a page that makes you a writer. It's whether your words move and / or motivate. A novelist may move through the creation of characters and plots. A web writer may motivate to action by carefully chosen words.

Both are writers. Both use their power over words to create an experience in the mind. That experience would not be there without the writer's ability to craft words.

What makes a writer a writer? We'll probably never be able to agree on a single definition. Too may people would disagree with the writer's version of the artist's definition, "A writer is a writer because he / she writes."