Tag: Write

How To Write Songs: 5 Ways to Beat Writer’s Block

DSC_0501_1287 Au clair de lune.

This is part of an article series about how to write songs, which I am writing entirely from my own experience as a songwriter. I don’t have any formal training and haven’t studied under any great teachers in the field, but I seem to have a knack for it, and it is my passion and livelihood. I have taught a number of successful songwriting workshops and am happily pursuing a career as an independent recording artist, performer, and producer. I hope these articles help you. If you like what you see, please comment with your own songwriting tips, questions, or success stories.

In this article I will share five different techniques that have helped me to shake myself free of writer’s block.

1. Take a Walk

I have written many, many songs while walking. I once wrote an entire song while delivering flyers for my home teaching business. (If you’re a fan of my music, you might be interested to know that I’m talking about It All Winds Up in the Glass from Thought Experiment.)

Taking a walk is a time-honoured technique for clearing the mind. Try not to think too much about the songwriting process at first, and don’t give yourself a destination. Just walk around for a while and the ideas will start to flow, like magic. It might be a good idea to take a recording device along with you to record your ideas, unless you have a very good memory. If you normally write with an instrument, like a guitar or piano, you might be surprised at how beneficial it can be to get away from your instrument for once. Which brings me to my next tip:

2. Change Instruments

If you normally write on the guitar, give the piano or keyboard a try. Even if you don’t think you know how to play the piano, plunking around on the keys might give you an idea for a melody. Getting away from instruments entirely can also be helpful. We tend to fall into certain habits and patterns when we play an instrument. If we get away from them and just hum or sing to ourselves, it gives us a chance to approach songwriting from a new angle.

3. Automatic Writing

Sit down in a quiet, calm place with a pen and paper (or your computer) and just write. Write as fast as you can and do your best not to think about it. If you haven’t done this before, you may feel self-conscious at first, but be patient. Once you learn to write without thinking, you will begin accessing your subconscious mind and giving it a voice. You may be very surprised at what comes out. This is a good way to come up with lyric ideas. They may need editing, but automatic writing can produce some wonderfully visceral and powerful lyrics.

4. Draw Stories From Your Life

Some of the best songs you can write will be based on your own experience. I’m talking about vivid life experiences: the very best and very worst things that have ever happened to you. What matters most, though, is not so much what has happened to you, but how you feel about it. For instance, if you had a difficult breakup, you may resist writing a song about it, thinking that it’s already been done to death. If you think about your own experience of that breakup, though, you will find something unique that could make a truly beautiful song. How did the pain feel, physically, in your chest, belly or throat? What were the dreams that you had to give up? What are the images that come to your head when you think of it? Going to the heart of your own experiences can create very powerful lyrics.

5. Draw Stories from Mythology and History

Are you interested in history or mythology? If you haven’t really thought about it before, this is a good time to start. There are millions of wonderful stories that make wonderful subject matter for songwriting. Singing of the deeds of heroes, the power of gods, and the fate of nations has kept songwriters busy for millennia.

How to Write an Article for a Student Magazine

Puerta en Macharaviaya (Málaga)

As with any magazine article, the key to writing one for students is to pick a topic that will capture their interest, and thus is relevant to their situation.

In a nutshell, work, money and travel all fit the bill in this sense, but within each of these broad themes lie a wealth of more specific ideas on which you can expand. Whether you’re currently a student yourself, or it’s been years since you attended a lecture, a good starting point is to see if you can draw on your own experience as this will provide immediate material first-hand, and writing from a personal slant often proves more inspiring than a factual piece from a purely objective viewpoint. For example, there may be aspects of your job that you could talk about in terms of career advice for students eager to work in a similar profession. Have you recently been on a gap year and feel your experience might motivate others to pursue similar options? Or perhaps you have a host of top tips to offer on the best way to manage money?

Since many of these subjects are already well-covered in student literature, an original approach is vital to holding your readers’ attention. Through the importance they attach to the latest trends, students tire quickly of anything run-of-the-mill and that applies not just to what you are talking about but also how you say it. Especially if you are writing about a well-worn topic, steer clear of clichés and giving the impression that they have heard it all before. How about tackling your article from an unconventional perspective – talking about a summer job abroad by focusing on the relational and the benefits that can bring to bear on continuing studies, rather than merely the practical. Have you been responsible for hiring new recruits? In which case why not present your guidance on what makes a good CV in the very format of a CV? Considering the huge role played by instant, online communication in student life today, could you spice up your words of wisdom on simple ways to save money by telling them through a student’s weekly status updates on Facebook?

Remember that, in their spirit of independence, students ultimately want to make up their own minds. So no matter how clear-cut you wish your counsel to be, subtle assistance conveyed in an entertaining, natural manner will make a much more positive impression than an in-your-face here’s-how. Although the vast majority of students are in the 18-24 age bracket, the economic downturn is pushing up the numbers of mature students seeking a career change. This not only gives rise to new article ideas (juggling part-time studies, work and family for example), but also makes the tone of your writing all the more important. Avoid imbuing your message with a know-all or know-best attitude.

Your best source of inspiration – and approval for your idea – is today’s students themselves. Ask them what they’d like to read about, it’s a simple as that!

How to Write an Article for a Student Magazine

Isaac Watts Statue, West Park. Southampton

As with any magazine article, the key to writing one for students is to pick a topic that will capture their interest, and thus is relevant to their situation.

In a nutshell, work, money and travel all fit the bill in this sense, but within each of these broad themes lie a wealth of more specific ideas on which you can expand. Whether you’re currently a student yourself, or it’s been years since you attended a lecture, a good starting point is to see if you can draw on your own experience as this will provide immediate material first-hand, and writing from a personal slant often proves more inspiring than a factual piece from a purely objective viewpoint. For example, there may be aspects of your job that you could talk about in terms of career advice for students eager to work in a similar profession. Have you recently been on a gap year and feel your experience might motivate others to pursue similar options? Or perhaps you have a host of top tips to offer on the best way to manage money?

Since many of these subjects are already well-covered in student literature, an original approach is vital to holding your readers’ attention. Through the importance they attach to the latest trends, students tire quickly of anything run-of-the-mill and that applies not just to what you are talking about but also how you say it. Especially if you are writing about a well-worn topic, steer clear of clichés and giving the impression that they have heard it all before. How about tackling your article from an unconventional perspective – talking about a summer job abroad by focusing on the relational and the benefits that can bring to bear on continuing studies, rather than merely the practical. Have you been responsible for hiring new recruits? In which case why not present your guidance on what makes a good CV in the very format of a CV? Considering the huge role played by instant, online communication in student life today, could you spice up your words of wisdom on simple ways to save money by telling them through a student’s weekly status updates on Facebook?

Remember that, in their spirit of independence, students ultimately want to make up their own minds. So no matter how clear-cut you wish your counsel to be, subtle assistance conveyed in an entertaining, natural manner will make a much more positive impression than an in-your-face here’s-how. Although the vast majority of students are in the 18-24 age bracket, the economic downturn is pushing up the numbers of mature students seeking a career change. This not only gives rise to new article ideas (juggling part-time studies, work and family for example), but also makes the tone of your writing all the more important. Avoid imbuing your message with a know-all or know-best attitude.

Your best source of inspiration – and approval for your idea – is today’s students themselves. Ask them what they’d like to read about, it’s a simple as that!

How To Write Songs: 5 Ways to Beat Writer’s Block

FQ9A7532

This is part of an article series about how to write songs, which I am writing entirely from my own experience as a songwriter. I don’t have any formal training and haven’t studied under any great teachers in the field, but I seem to have a knack for it, and it is my passion and livelihood. I have taught a number of successful songwriting workshops and am happily pursuing a career as an independent recording artist, performer, and producer. I hope these articles help you. If you like what you see, please comment with your own songwriting tips, questions, or success stories.

In this article I will share five different techniques that have helped me to shake myself free of writer’s block.

1. Take a Walk

I have written many, many songs while walking. I once wrote an entire song while delivering flyers for my home teaching business. (If you’re a fan of my music, you might be interested to know that I’m talking about It All Winds Up in the Glass from Thought Experiment.)

Taking a walk is a time-honoured technique for clearing the mind. Try not to think too much about the songwriting process at first, and don’t give yourself a destination. Just walk around for a while and the ideas will start to flow, like magic. It might be a good idea to take a recording device along with you to record your ideas, unless you have a very good memory. If you normally write with an instrument, like a guitar or piano, you might be surprised at how beneficial it can be to get away from your instrument for once. Which brings me to my next tip:

2. Change Instruments

If you normally write on the guitar, give the piano or keyboard a try. Even if you don’t think you know how to play the piano, plunking around on the keys might give you an idea for a melody. Getting away from instruments entirely can also be helpful. We tend to fall into certain habits and patterns when we play an instrument. If we get away from them and just hum or sing to ourselves, it gives us a chance to approach songwriting from a new angle.

3. Automatic Writing

Sit down in a quiet, calm place with a pen and paper (or your computer) and just write. Write as fast as you can and do your best not to think about it. If you haven’t done this before, you may feel self-conscious at first, but be patient. Once you learn to write without thinking, you will begin accessing your subconscious mind and giving it a voice. You may be very surprised at what comes out. This is a good way to come up with lyric ideas. They may need editing, but automatic writing can produce some wonderfully visceral and powerful lyrics.

4. Draw Stories From Your Life

Some of the best songs you can write will be based on your own experience. I’m talking about vivid life experiences: the very best and very worst things that have ever happened to you. What matters most, though, is not so much what has happened to you, but how you feel about it. For instance, if you had a difficult breakup, you may resist writing a song about it, thinking that it’s already been done to death. If you think about your own experience of that breakup, though, you will find something unique that could make a truly beautiful song. How did the pain feel, physically, in your chest, belly or throat? What were the dreams that you had to give up? What are the images that come to your head when you think of it? Going to the heart of your own experiences can create very powerful lyrics.

5. Draw Stories from Mythology and History

Are you interested in history or mythology? If you haven’t really thought about it before, this is a good time to start. There are millions of wonderful stories that make wonderful subject matter for songwriting. Singing of the deeds of heroes, the power of gods, and the fate of nations has kept songwriters busy for millennia.

How To Write Songs: 5 Ways to Beat Writer’s Block

South Queensferry, Scotland

This is part of an article series about how to write songs, which I am writing entirely from my own experience as a songwriter. I don’t have any formal training and haven’t studied under any great teachers in the field, but I seem to have a knack for it, and it is my passion and livelihood. I have taught a number of successful songwriting workshops and am happily pursuing a career as an independent recording artist, performer, and producer. I hope these articles help you. If you like what you see, please comment with your own songwriting tips, questions, or success stories.

In this article I will share five different techniques that have helped me to shake myself free of writer’s block.

1. Take a Walk

I have written many, many songs while walking. I once wrote an entire song while delivering flyers for my home teaching business. (If you’re a fan of my music, you might be interested to know that I’m talking about It All Winds Up in the Glass from Thought Experiment.)

Taking a walk is a time-honoured technique for clearing the mind. Try not to think too much about the songwriting process at first, and don’t give yourself a destination. Just walk around for a while and the ideas will start to flow, like magic. It might be a good idea to take a recording device along with you to record your ideas, unless you have a very good memory. If you normally write with an instrument, like a guitar or piano, you might be surprised at how beneficial it can be to get away from your instrument for once. Which brings me to my next tip:

2. Change Instruments

If you normally write on the guitar, give the piano or keyboard a try. Even if you don’t think you know how to play the piano, plunking around on the keys might give you an idea for a melody. Getting away from instruments entirely can also be helpful. We tend to fall into certain habits and patterns when we play an instrument. If we get away from them and just hum or sing to ourselves, it gives us a chance to approach songwriting from a new angle.

3. Automatic Writing

Sit down in a quiet, calm place with a pen and paper (or your computer) and just write. Write as fast as you can and do your best not to think about it. If you haven’t done this before, you may feel self-conscious at first, but be patient. Once you learn to write without thinking, you will begin accessing your subconscious mind and giving it a voice. You may be very surprised at what comes out. This is a good way to come up with lyric ideas. They may need editing, but automatic writing can produce some wonderfully visceral and powerful lyrics.

4. Draw Stories From Your Life

Some of the best songs you can write will be based on your own experience. I’m talking about vivid life experiences: the very best and very worst things that have ever happened to you. What matters most, though, is not so much what has happened to you, but how you feel about it. For instance, if you had a difficult breakup, you may resist writing a song about it, thinking that it’s already been done to death. If you think about your own experience of that breakup, though, you will find something unique that could make a truly beautiful song. How did the pain feel, physically, in your chest, belly or throat? What were the dreams that you had to give up? What are the images that come to your head when you think of it? Going to the heart of your own experiences can create very powerful lyrics.

5. Draw Stories from Mythology and History

Are you interested in history or mythology? If you haven’t really thought about it before, this is a good time to start. There are millions of wonderful stories that make wonderful subject matter for songwriting. Singing of the deeds of heroes, the power of gods, and the fate of nations has kept songwriters busy for millennia.

How to Write an Article for a Student Magazine

Cramond Island

As with any magazine article, the key to writing one for students is to pick a topic that will capture their interest, and thus is relevant to their situation.

In a nutshell, work, money and travel all fit the bill in this sense, but within each of these broad themes lie a wealth of more specific ideas on which you can expand. Whether you’re currently a student yourself, or it’s been years since you attended a lecture, a good starting point is to see if you can draw on your own experience as this will provide immediate material first-hand, and writing from a personal slant often proves more inspiring than a factual piece from a purely objective viewpoint. For example, there may be aspects of your job that you could talk about in terms of career advice for students eager to work in a similar profession. Have you recently been on a gap year and feel your experience might motivate others to pursue similar options? Or perhaps you have a host of top tips to offer on the best way to manage money?

Since many of these subjects are already well-covered in student literature, an original approach is vital to holding your readers’ attention. Through the importance they attach to the latest trends, students tire quickly of anything run-of-the-mill and that applies not just to what you are talking about but also how you say it. Especially if you are writing about a well-worn topic, steer clear of clichés and giving the impression that they have heard it all before. How about tackling your article from an unconventional perspective – talking about a summer job abroad by focusing on the relational and the benefits that can bring to bear on continuing studies, rather than merely the practical. Have you been responsible for hiring new recruits? In which case why not present your guidance on what makes a good CV in the very format of a CV? Considering the huge role played by instant, online communication in student life today, could you spice up your words of wisdom on simple ways to save money by telling them through a student’s weekly status updates on Facebook?

Remember that, in their spirit of independence, students ultimately want to make up their own minds. So no matter how clear-cut you wish your counsel to be, subtle assistance conveyed in an entertaining, natural manner will make a much more positive impression than an in-your-face here’s-how. Although the vast majority of students are in the 18-24 age bracket, the economic downturn is pushing up the numbers of mature students seeking a career change. This not only gives rise to new article ideas (juggling part-time studies, work and family for example), but also makes the tone of your writing all the more important. Avoid imbuing your message with a know-all or know-best attitude.

Your best source of inspiration – and approval for your idea – is today’s students themselves. Ask them what they’d like to read about, it’s a simple as that!

How To Write Songs: 5 Ways to Beat Writer’s Block

Morphing Kafka sleeping now

This is part of an article series about how to write songs, which I am writing entirely from my own experience as a songwriter. I don’t have any formal training and haven’t studied under any great teachers in the field, but I seem to have a knack for it, and it is my passion and livelihood. I have taught a number of successful songwriting workshops and am happily pursuing a career as an independent recording artist, performer, and producer. I hope these articles help you. If you like what you see, please comment with your own songwriting tips, questions, or success stories.

In this article I will share five different techniques that have helped me to shake myself free of writer’s block.

1. Take a Walk

I have written many, many songs while walking. I once wrote an entire song while delivering flyers for my home teaching business. (If you’re a fan of my music, you might be interested to know that I’m talking about It All Winds Up in the Glass from Thought Experiment.)

Taking a walk is a time-honoured technique for clearing the mind. Try not to think too much about the songwriting process at first, and don’t give yourself a destination. Just walk around for a while and the ideas will start to flow, like magic. It might be a good idea to take a recording device along with you to record your ideas, unless you have a very good memory. If you normally write with an instrument, like a guitar or piano, you might be surprised at how beneficial it can be to get away from your instrument for once. Which brings me to my next tip:

2. Change Instruments

If you normally write on the guitar, give the piano or keyboard a try. Even if you don’t think you know how to play the piano, plunking around on the keys might give you an idea for a melody. Getting away from instruments entirely can also be helpful. We tend to fall into certain habits and patterns when we play an instrument. If we get away from them and just hum or sing to ourselves, it gives us a chance to approach songwriting from a new angle.

3. Automatic Writing

Sit down in a quiet, calm place with a pen and paper (or your computer) and just write. Write as fast as you can and do your best not to think about it. If you haven’t done this before, you may feel self-conscious at first, but be patient. Once you learn to write without thinking, you will begin accessing your subconscious mind and giving it a voice. You may be very surprised at what comes out. This is a good way to come up with lyric ideas. They may need editing, but automatic writing can produce some wonderfully visceral and powerful lyrics.

4. Draw Stories From Your Life

Some of the best songs you can write will be based on your own experience. I’m talking about vivid life experiences: the very best and very worst things that have ever happened to you. What matters most, though, is not so much what has happened to you, but how you feel about it. For instance, if you had a difficult breakup, you may resist writing a song about it, thinking that it’s already been done to death. If you think about your own experience of that breakup, though, you will find something unique that could make a truly beautiful song. How did the pain feel, physically, in your chest, belly or throat? What were the dreams that you had to give up? What are the images that come to your head when you think of it? Going to the heart of your own experiences can create very powerful lyrics.

5. Draw Stories from Mythology and History

Are you interested in history or mythology? If you haven’t really thought about it before, this is a good time to start. There are millions of wonderful stories that make wonderful subject matter for songwriting. Singing of the deeds of heroes, the power of gods, and the fate of nations has kept songwriters busy for millennia.

How to Write an Article for a Student Magazine

Batemans Castle

As with any magazine article, the key to writing one for students is to pick a topic that will capture their interest, and thus is relevant to their situation.

In a nutshell, work, money and travel all fit the bill in this sense, but within each of these broad themes lie a wealth of more specific ideas on which you can expand. Whether you’re currently a student yourself, or it’s been years since you attended a lecture, a good starting point is to see if you can draw on your own experience as this will provide immediate material first-hand, and writing from a personal slant often proves more inspiring than a factual piece from a purely objective viewpoint. For example, there may be aspects of your job that you could talk about in terms of career advice for students eager to work in a similar profession. Have you recently been on a gap year and feel your experience might motivate others to pursue similar options? Or perhaps you have a host of top tips to offer on the best way to manage money?

Since many of these subjects are already well-covered in student literature, an original approach is vital to holding your readers’ attention. Through the importance they attach to the latest trends, students tire quickly of anything run-of-the-mill and that applies not just to what you are talking about but also how you say it. Especially if you are writing about a well-worn topic, steer clear of clichés and giving the impression that they have heard it all before. How about tackling your article from an unconventional perspective – talking about a summer job abroad by focusing on the relational and the benefits that can bring to bear on continuing studies, rather than merely the practical. Have you been responsible for hiring new recruits? In which case why not present your guidance on what makes a good CV in the very format of a CV? Considering the huge role played by instant, online communication in student life today, could you spice up your words of wisdom on simple ways to save money by telling them through a student’s weekly status updates on Facebook?

Remember that, in their spirit of independence, students ultimately want to make up their own minds. So no matter how clear-cut you wish your counsel to be, subtle assistance conveyed in an entertaining, natural manner will make a much more positive impression than an in-your-face here’s-how. Although the vast majority of students are in the 18-24 age bracket, the economic downturn is pushing up the numbers of mature students seeking a career change. This not only gives rise to new article ideas (juggling part-time studies, work and family for example), but also makes the tone of your writing all the more important. Avoid imbuing your message with a know-all or know-best attitude.

Your best source of inspiration – and approval for your idea – is today’s students themselves. Ask them what they’d like to read about, it’s a simple as that!

How To Write Songs: 5 Ways to Beat Writer’s Block

view on Muiderslot from the castle gardens

This is part of an article series about how to write songs, which I am writing entirely from my own experience as a songwriter. I don’t have any formal training and haven’t studied under any great teachers in the field, but I seem to have a knack for it, and it is my passion and livelihood. I have taught a number of successful songwriting workshops and am happily pursuing a career as an independent recording artist, performer, and producer. I hope these articles help you. If you like what you see, please comment with your own songwriting tips, questions, or success stories.

In this article I will share five different techniques that have helped me to shake myself free of writer’s block.

1. Take a Walk

I have written many, many songs while walking. I once wrote an entire song while delivering flyers for my home teaching business. (If you’re a fan of my music, you might be interested to know that I’m talking about It All Winds Up in the Glass from Thought Experiment.)

Taking a walk is a time-honoured technique for clearing the mind. Try not to think too much about the songwriting process at first, and don’t give yourself a destination. Just walk around for a while and the ideas will start to flow, like magic. It might be a good idea to take a recording device along with you to record your ideas, unless you have a very good memory. If you normally write with an instrument, like a guitar or piano, you might be surprised at how beneficial it can be to get away from your instrument for once. Which brings me to my next tip:

2. Change Instruments

If you normally write on the guitar, give the piano or keyboard a try. Even if you don’t think you know how to play the piano, plunking around on the keys might give you an idea for a melody. Getting away from instruments entirely can also be helpful. We tend to fall into certain habits and patterns when we play an instrument. If we get away from them and just hum or sing to ourselves, it gives us a chance to approach songwriting from a new angle.

3. Automatic Writing

Sit down in a quiet, calm place with a pen and paper (or your computer) and just write. Write as fast as you can and do your best not to think about it. If you haven’t done this before, you may feel self-conscious at first, but be patient. Once you learn to write without thinking, you will begin accessing your subconscious mind and giving it a voice. You may be very surprised at what comes out. This is a good way to come up with lyric ideas. They may need editing, but automatic writing can produce some wonderfully visceral and powerful lyrics.

4. Draw Stories From Your Life

Some of the best songs you can write will be based on your own experience. I’m talking about vivid life experiences: the very best and very worst things that have ever happened to you. What matters most, though, is not so much what has happened to you, but how you feel about it. For instance, if you had a difficult breakup, you may resist writing a song about it, thinking that it’s already been done to death. If you think about your own experience of that breakup, though, you will find something unique that could make a truly beautiful song. How did the pain feel, physically, in your chest, belly or throat? What were the dreams that you had to give up? What are the images that come to your head when you think of it? Going to the heart of your own experiences can create very powerful lyrics.

5. Draw Stories from Mythology and History

Are you interested in history or mythology? If you haven’t really thought about it before, this is a good time to start. There are millions of wonderful stories that make wonderful subject matter for songwriting. Singing of the deeds of heroes, the power of gods, and the fate of nations has kept songwriters busy for millennia.

How To Write Songs: 5 Ways to Beat Writer’s Block

The Riddler 2010 Phoenix Comicon

This is part of an article series about how to write songs, which I am writing entirely from my own experience as a songwriter. I don’t have any formal training and haven’t studied under any great teachers in the field, but I seem to have a knack for it, and it is my passion and livelihood. I have taught a number of successful songwriting workshops and am happily pursuing a career as an independent recording artist, performer, and producer. I hope these articles help you. If you like what you see, please comment with your own songwriting tips, questions, or success stories.

In this article I will share five different techniques that have helped me to shake myself free of writer’s block.

1. Take a Walk

I have written many, many songs while walking. I once wrote an entire song while delivering flyers for my home teaching business. (If you’re a fan of my music, you might be interested to know that I’m talking about It All Winds Up in the Glass from Thought Experiment.)

Taking a walk is a time-honoured technique for clearing the mind. Try not to think too much about the songwriting process at first, and don’t give yourself a destination. Just walk around for a while and the ideas will start to flow, like magic. It might be a good idea to take a recording device along with you to record your ideas, unless you have a very good memory. If you normally write with an instrument, like a guitar or piano, you might be surprised at how beneficial it can be to get away from your instrument for once. Which brings me to my next tip:

2. Change Instruments

If you normally write on the guitar, give the piano or keyboard a try. Even if you don’t think you know how to play the piano, plunking around on the keys might give you an idea for a melody. Getting away from instruments entirely can also be helpful. We tend to fall into certain habits and patterns when we play an instrument. If we get away from them and just hum or sing to ourselves, it gives us a chance to approach songwriting from a new angle.

3. Automatic Writing

Sit down in a quiet, calm place with a pen and paper (or your computer) and just write. Write as fast as you can and do your best not to think about it. If you haven’t done this before, you may feel self-conscious at first, but be patient. Once you learn to write without thinking, you will begin accessing your subconscious mind and giving it a voice. You may be very surprised at what comes out. This is a good way to come up with lyric ideas. They may need editing, but automatic writing can produce some wonderfully visceral and powerful lyrics.

4. Draw Stories From Your Life

Some of the best songs you can write will be based on your own experience. I’m talking about vivid life experiences: the very best and very worst things that have ever happened to you. What matters most, though, is not so much what has happened to you, but how you feel about it. For instance, if you had a difficult breakup, you may resist writing a song about it, thinking that it’s already been done to death. If you think about your own experience of that breakup, though, you will find something unique that could make a truly beautiful song. How did the pain feel, physically, in your chest, belly or throat? What were the dreams that you had to give up? What are the images that come to your head when you think of it? Going to the heart of your own experiences can create very powerful lyrics.

5. Draw Stories from Mythology and History

Are you interested in history or mythology? If you haven’t really thought about it before, this is a good time to start. There are millions of wonderful stories that make wonderful subject matter for songwriting. Singing of the deeds of heroes, the power of gods, and the fate of nations has kept songwriters busy for millennia.