Tag: Types

Introduction To Types Of Small Business Finance

the lonely tree

The best to place to start looking for small business finance is with the SBA. They have all kinds of financial assistance and grant programs for small business owners. Assuming there’s a need for financing from the commercial market outside of the SBA’s purview, outlined herein are a few basics about the options available to small business owners.

The most basic question that the business owner needs to ponder over is whether to opt for debt financing or equity financing. Each has its pros and cons and further sub-divisions in terms of types of financing. Which one is more suitable depends on factors such as the type of business, its age, cash flow and the credit rating and history of the owner.

Debt finance can be a loan, bond or line of credit from a bank or other lenders, or even a simple IOU. It is usually the best option when the business project is very specific and has a well defined timeline. The borrower needs to put up something as collateral as a form of security.

The owner’s credit rating and history will have a big impact on the ability to secure small business financing. The business also has to have a good enough cash flow (or projected cash flow) in order to meet the repayment schedule. It is important for the owner to do some business planning to figure out a feasible repayment period based on cash flow.

With equity financing, the owner offers the investor part ownership in return for cash. It has certain disadvantages such as loss of control, since the investor would like to a part of the decision making process. But unlike small business loans, equity investments don’t need to be paid back with interest, so it makes it easier to run the business.

The equity option is feasible for broad and long-term financing needs which have no specific and immediate timelines for an ROI. To be noted that equity investors seek higher returns, even if it is after a relatively longer delay. The owner is not likely to regain full control in the short-term and probably not even in the long term.

Equity investment can in the form of individual investments made on a personal basis by the owner, friends, family, colleagues or angel investors. It could be funding provided by a venture capital firm. Equity financing is more focused on the success potential of the project and does not require the kind of guarantees or collateral required for debt financing.

As mentioned above, the decision on debt vs. Equity will depend on the type of business, its current situation and the owner’s credibility. Too much debt is not good for the business, and neither is losing control entirely to equity investors. The right balance needs to be found, and this debt-equity ratio is different for different kinds of industries.

On a related note, it helps to have more options on how to use it to maximize the impact of the financing on the business. For instance, instead of purchasing equipment outright, it might be beneficial to consider equipment leasing finance. There are many more such things that need to be considered, and it is best to consult a lawyer or trusted banker for more information regarding suitable options for small business finance.

Types of Surety Bonds for Business

Fleet Street

There are many different types of surety bonds for businesses. These will vary from state to state in terms of their names, their requirements and specifications, and more. In this quick guide, you'll learn a little bit more about business bonds, why you may need them, and an overview of their various types.

First, why is it important that you have surety bonds for business? They are often a legal requirement of a state in order to conduct business or hold a certain form of license or permit. Therefore, you need them to even start running your business or pursuing certain professions.

However, in addition to this, many types of surety business bonds will help boost your reputation and trust within the community. Consumers who see that you are fully bonded and insured can depend upon you for actually completing your work, and doing it properly and professionally.

With that out of the way, what types of surety business bonds are available? The quick answer is that there are dozens and dozens of different business surety bonds. Let's discuss a few of the over-arching categories to help give you a better idea.

  • Professional licenses: As mentioned, these vary by state, but professional licenses may include a huge range of different carers. You may not only need the license itself, but also the proper bonding to protect yourself as you pursue this career and ensure you stay within regulations.
  • Auto Dealers: Auto dealers include many different sub-sets, such as used auto dealers or recreational vehicle dealers. For each one though, you'll like a business surety bond before you ever open your doors, and these will need to be renewed annually.
  • Contractors and Construction: These are some of the most well known business surety bonds. Contractors often advertise be "bonded and insured" as a testament to their reputation and trustworthiness, as stated above. Different varieties of contractors, from plumbers to roofers and everything in between, although may need different licenses, and bonds.
  • Bids, Contracts and Performance: These are different but related types of surety bonds. Bid bonds lock you into the price you put forth in a project bidding process; contract bonds ensure you fulfill all aspects of a contract, and performance bonds ensure you complete a project and fulfill the performance you set out to do.

That's just the start though. The full list of types of surety business bonds would be massive, and includes a few other popular categories such as telemarketing, seller of travel, Medicare and Medicaid providers, utility companies, title agencies, schools, health clubs, sporting events, promoters and agents , agricultural bonds, financial services, collection agencies, alcohol and tobacco sales, lottery sales, and many others.

Hopefully you've learned a little bit more about the types of surety bonds for businesses which exist today. Be sure to check up with your state's specific regulations and requirements for bonding and licensing for the business you run, or the career you plan to pursue.

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Introduction To Types Of Small Business Finance

zaxo 2010 photo

The best to place to start looking for small business finance is with the SBA. They have all kinds of financial assistance and grant programs for small business owners. Assuming there’s a need for financing from the commercial market outside of the SBA’s purview, outlined herein are a few basics about the options available to small business owners.

The most basic question that the business owner needs to ponder over is whether to opt for debt financing or equity financing. Each has its pros and cons and further sub-divisions in terms of types of financing. Which one is more suitable depends on factors such as the type of business, its age, cash flow and the credit rating and history of the owner.

Debt finance can be a loan, bond or line of credit from a bank or other lenders, or even a simple IOU. It is usually the best option when the business project is very specific and has a well defined timeline. The borrower needs to put up something as collateral as a form of security.

The owner’s credit rating and history will have a big impact on the ability to secure small business financing. The business also has to have a good enough cash flow (or projected cash flow) in order to meet the repayment schedule. It is important for the owner to do some business planning to figure out a feasible repayment period based on cash flow.

With equity financing, the owner offers the investor part ownership in return for cash. It has certain disadvantages such as loss of control, since the investor would like to a part of the decision making process. But unlike small business loans, equity investments don’t need to be paid back with interest, so it makes it easier to run the business.

The equity option is feasible for broad and long-term financing needs which have no specific and immediate timelines for an ROI. To be noted that equity investors seek higher returns, even if it is after a relatively longer delay. The owner is not likely to regain full control in the short-term and probably not even in the long term.

Equity investment can in the form of individual investments made on a personal basis by the owner, friends, family, colleagues or angel investors. It could be funding provided by a venture capital firm. Equity financing is more focused on the success potential of the project and does not require the kind of guarantees or collateral required for debt financing.

As mentioned above, the decision on debt vs. Equity will depend on the type of business, its current situation and the owner’s credibility. Too much debt is not good for the business, and neither is losing control entirely to equity investors. The right balance needs to be found, and this debt-equity ratio is different for different kinds of industries.

On a related note, it helps to have more options on how to use it to maximize the impact of the financing on the business. For instance, instead of purchasing equipment outright, it might be beneficial to consider equipment leasing finance. There are many more such things that need to be considered, and it is best to consult a lawyer or trusted banker for more information regarding suitable options for small business finance.

Introduction To Types Of Small Business Finance

Missing Spring

The best to place to start looking for small business finance is with the SBA. They have all kinds of financial assistance and grant programs for small business owners. Assuming there’s a need for financing from the commercial market outside of the SBA’s purview, outlined herein are a few basics about the options available to small business owners.

The most basic question that the business owner needs to ponder over is whether to opt for debt financing or equity financing. Each has its pros and cons and further sub-divisions in terms of types of financing. Which one is more suitable depends on factors such as the type of business, its age, cash flow and the credit rating and history of the owner.

Debt finance can be a loan, bond or line of credit from a bank or other lenders, or even a simple IOU. It is usually the best option when the business project is very specific and has a well defined timeline. The borrower needs to put up something as collateral as a form of security.

The owner’s credit rating and history will have a big impact on the ability to secure small business financing. The business also has to have a good enough cash flow (or projected cash flow) in order to meet the repayment schedule. It is important for the owner to do some business planning to figure out a feasible repayment period based on cash flow.

With equity financing, the owner offers the investor part ownership in return for cash. It has certain disadvantages such as loss of control, since the investor would like to a part of the decision making process. But unlike small business loans, equity investments don’t need to be paid back with interest, so it makes it easier to run the business.

The equity option is feasible for broad and long-term financing needs which have no specific and immediate timelines for an ROI. To be noted that equity investors seek higher returns, even if it is after a relatively longer delay. The owner is not likely to regain full control in the short-term and probably not even in the long term.

Equity investment can in the form of individual investments made on a personal basis by the owner, friends, family, colleagues or angel investors. It could be funding provided by a venture capital firm. Equity financing is more focused on the success potential of the project and does not require the kind of guarantees or collateral required for debt financing.

As mentioned above, the decision on debt vs. Equity will depend on the type of business, its current situation and the owner’s credibility. Too much debt is not good for the business, and neither is losing control entirely to equity investors. The right balance needs to be found, and this debt-equity ratio is different for different kinds of industries.

On a related note, it helps to have more options on how to use it to maximize the impact of the financing on the business. For instance, instead of purchasing equipment outright, it might be beneficial to consider equipment leasing finance. There are many more such things that need to be considered, and it is best to consult a lawyer or trusted banker for more information regarding suitable options for small business finance.

Types of Surety Bonds for Business

Akko old city harbour

There are many different types of surety bonds for businesses. These will vary from state to state in terms of their names, their requirements and specifications, and more. In this quick guide, you'll learn a little bit more about business bonds, why you may need them, and an overview of their various types.

First, why is it important that you have surety bonds for business? They are often a legal requirement of a state in order to conduct business or hold a certain form of license or permit. Therefore, you need them to even start running your business or pursuing certain professions.

However, in addition to this, many types of surety business bonds will help boost your reputation and trust within the community. Consumers who see that you are fully bonded and insured can depend upon you for actually completing your work, and doing it properly and professionally.

With that out of the way, what types of surety business bonds are available? The quick answer is that there are dozens and dozens of different business surety bonds. Let's discuss a few of the over-arching categories to help give you a better idea.

  • Professional licenses: As mentioned, these vary by state, but professional licenses may include a huge range of different carers. You may not only need the license itself, but also the proper bonding to protect yourself as you pursue this career and ensure you stay within regulations.
  • Auto Dealers: Auto dealers include many different sub-sets, such as used auto dealers or recreational vehicle dealers. For each one though, you'll like a business surety bond before you ever open your doors, and these will need to be renewed annually.
  • Contractors and Construction: These are some of the most well known business surety bonds. Contractors often advertise be "bonded and insured" as a testament to their reputation and trustworthiness, as stated above. Different varieties of contractors, from plumbers to roofers and everything in between, although may need different licenses, and bonds.
  • Bids, Contracts and Performance: These are different but related types of surety bonds. Bid bonds lock you into the price you put forth in a project bidding process; contract bonds ensure you fulfill all aspects of a contract, and performance bonds ensure you complete a project and fulfill the performance you set out to do.

That's just the start though. The full list of types of surety business bonds would be massive, and includes a few other popular categories such as telemarketing, seller of travel, Medicare and Medicaid providers, utility companies, title agencies, schools, health clubs, sporting events, promoters and agents , agricultural bonds, financial services, collection agencies, alcohol and tobacco sales, lottery sales, and many others.

Hopefully you've learned a little bit more about the types of surety bonds for businesses which exist today. Be sure to check up with your state's specific regulations and requirements for bonding and licensing for the business you run, or the career you plan to pursue.

Introduction To Types Of Small Business Finance

Batemans Castle

The best to place to start looking for small business finance is with the SBA. They have all kinds of financial assistance and grant programs for small business owners. Assuming there’s a need for financing from the commercial market outside of the SBA’s purview, outlined herein are a few basics about the options available to small business owners.

The most basic question that the business owner needs to ponder over is whether to opt for debt financing or equity financing. Each has its pros and cons and further sub-divisions in terms of types of financing. Which one is more suitable depends on factors such as the type of business, its age, cash flow and the credit rating and history of the owner.

Debt finance can be a loan, bond or line of credit from a bank or other lenders, or even a simple IOU. It is usually the best option when the business project is very specific and has a well defined timeline. The borrower needs to put up something as collateral as a form of security.

The owner’s credit rating and history will have a big impact on the ability to secure small business financing. The business also has to have a good enough cash flow (or projected cash flow) in order to meet the repayment schedule. It is important for the owner to do some business planning to figure out a feasible repayment period based on cash flow.

With equity financing, the owner offers the investor part ownership in return for cash. It has certain disadvantages such as loss of control, since the investor would like to a part of the decision making process. But unlike small business loans, equity investments don’t need to be paid back with interest, so it makes it easier to run the business.

The equity option is feasible for broad and long-term financing needs which have no specific and immediate timelines for an ROI. To be noted that equity investors seek higher returns, even if it is after a relatively longer delay. The owner is not likely to regain full control in the short-term and probably not even in the long term.

Equity investment can in the form of individual investments made on a personal basis by the owner, friends, family, colleagues or angel investors. It could be funding provided by a venture capital firm. Equity financing is more focused on the success potential of the project and does not require the kind of guarantees or collateral required for debt financing.

As mentioned above, the decision on debt vs. Equity will depend on the type of business, its current situation and the owner’s credibility. Too much debt is not good for the business, and neither is losing control entirely to equity investors. The right balance needs to be found, and this debt-equity ratio is different for different kinds of industries.

On a related note, it helps to have more options on how to use it to maximize the impact of the financing on the business. For instance, instead of purchasing equipment outright, it might be beneficial to consider equipment leasing finance. There are many more such things that need to be considered, and it is best to consult a lawyer or trusted banker for more information regarding suitable options for small business finance.

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The 4 Different Types of Connectives Used in Good Public Speaking

sunrise off the bow

Good public speaking skills involve more than presenting informative or persuasive material to an audience in an engaging, uplifting manner. It requires the use of connectives to keep your presentation or speech organized as well as unified. Better than a verbal tic, such as ‘um’ or ‘ah,’ by employing good connectives in your speech, you will also make it easier for your listeners to both follow what you are saying and remember more of what you are saying.

The 4 types of connectives include:

1. Signposts

Without a doubt, one of the most popular forms of connectives are signposts. The signpost refers to very brief statements that tell your audience where you are in your speech. They can be numbers – the 1st idea, the 2nd idea, etc.; they can be questions which offer good audience interaction; and, they can be phrases that underscore important points in your message.

Example: The most important thing I want you to gain from my presentation is that breathing with the support of your diaphragm will not only end vocal abuse but it will also mean a more confident, more mature-sounding speaking voice.

In the above statement, I have reiterated what I want my audience to remember but I have also let them know that I have come to the end of my development. While those words are not my concluding statement, they have paved the way for my conclusion.

2. Transitions

Transitions are words or phrases that mark the end of one thought or idea and move the speaker into another thought or idea by including material from the previous statement into the new one.

Example: Now that we have seen that the habitual voice can be affected by vocal abuse, allow me to explain how the situation can be reversed.

In the above sentence, the words in bold mark the transition, reinforcing my previous statements and paving the way for the new statement.

3. Internal Previews

Similar to the transition and often including a transition, the internal preview is found in the development of the speech or presentation and includes what is coming up in greater detail than the transition. The preview is in bold.

Example: Now that we have seen that the habitual voice can be affected by vocal abuse, the remedy is quite simple. Learn to breathe with the support of your diaphragm and allow your chests to power your voice.

Including the original transition, the internal preview consists of the statement which follows in bold.

4. Internal Summaries

Found also in the development of the speech or presentation, the internal summary is the opposite of the internal preview because it lists ever so briefly what has already been stated. These summaries are important because they reinforce what has already been said, making it easier for your audience to follow your message.

Example: In essence, by learning to breathe properly, finding the optimum pitch of your speaking voice, and allowing your chest to do the work, you will eliminate vocal abuse forever.

The above sentence summarizes succinctly what may have been discussed for the last 10, 20 or even 40 minutes of your delivery.

Using any and all of the above connectives in your delivery are very effective means of keeping your audience’s attention as well as keeping your talk organized. Use them and your listeners will remember more of what you have said.

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Introduction To Types Of Small Business Finance

زاخو

The best to place to start looking for small business finance is with the SBA. They have all kinds of financial assistance and grant programs for small business owners. Assuming there's a need for financing from the commercial market outside of the SBA's purview, outlined here are a few basics about the options available to small business owners.

The most basic question that the business owner needs to ponder over is whether to opt for debt financing or equity financing. Each has its pros and cons and further sub-divisions in terms of types of financing. Which one is more suitable depends on factors such as the type of business, its age, cash flow and the credit rating and history of the owner.

Debt finance can be a loan, bond or line of credit from a bank or other lenders, or even a simple IOU. It is usually the best option when the business project is very specific and has a well defined timeline. The borrower needs to put up something as collateral as a form of security.

The owner's credit rating and history will have a big impact on the ability to secure small business financing. The business also has to have a good enough cash flow (or projected cash flow) in order to meet the repayment schedule. It is important for the owner to do some business planning to figure out a feasible repayment period based on cash flow.

With equity financing, the owner offers the investor part ownership in return for cash. It has certain disadvantages such as loss of control, since the investor would like to a part of the decision making process. But unlike small business loans, equity investments do not need to be paid back with interest, so it makes it easier to run the business.

The equity option is feasible for broad and long-term financing needs which have no specific and immediate timelines for an ROI. To be noted that equity investors seek higher returns, even if it is after a reliably longer delay. The owner is not likely to regain full control in the short-term and probably not even in the long term.

Equity investment can in the form of individual investments made on a personal basis by the owner, friends, family, collections or angel investors. It could be funding provided by a venture capital firm. Equity financing is more focused on the success potential of the project and does not require the kind of guarantees or collateral required for debt financing.

As mentioned above, the decision on debt vs. Equity will depend on the type of business, its current situation and the owner's credibility. Too much debt is not good for the business, and neither is losing control to equity investors. The right balance needs to be found, and this debt-equity ratio is different for different kinds of industries.

On a related note, it helps to have more options on how to use it to maximize the impact of the financing on the business. For instance, instead of purchasing equipment outright, it may be beneficial to consider equipment leasing finance. There are many more such things that need to be considered, and it is best to consult a lawyer or trusted banker for more information regarding suitable options for small business finance.

Introduction To Types Of Small Business Finance

Puerta en Macharaviaya (Málaga)

The best to place to start looking for small business finance is with the SBA. They have all kinds of financial assistance and grant programs for small business owners. Assuming there's a need for financing from the commercial market outside of the SBA's purview, outlined here are a few basics about the options available to small business owners.

The most basic question that the business owner needs to ponder over is whether to opt for debt financing or equity financing. Each has its pros and cons and further sub-divisions in terms of types of financing. Which one is more suitable depends on factors such as the type of business, its age, cash flow and the credit rating and history of the owner.

Debt finance can be a loan, bond or line of credit from a bank or other lenders, or even a simple IOU. It is usually the best option when the business project is very specific and has a well defined timeline. The borrower needs to put up something as collateral as a form of security.

The owner's credit rating and history will have a big impact on the ability to secure small business financing. The business also has to have a good enough cash flow (or projected cash flow) in order to meet the repayment schedule. It is important for the owner to do some business planning to figure out a feasible repayment period based on cash flow.

With equity financing, the owner offers the investor part ownership in return for cash. It has certain disadvantages such as loss of control, since the investor would like to a part of the decision making process. But unlike small business loans, equity investments do not need to be paid back with interest, so it makes it easier to run the business.

The equity option is feasible for broad and long-term financing needs which have no specific and immediate timelines for an ROI. To be noted that equity investors seek higher returns, even if it is after a reliably longer delay. The owner is not likely to regain full control in the short-term and probably not even in the long term.

Equity investment can in the form of individual investments made on a personal basis by the owner, friends, family, collections or angel investors. It could be funding provided by a venture capital firm. Equity financing is more focused on the success potential of the project and does not require the kind of guarantees or collateral required for debt financing.

As mentioned above, the decision on debt vs. Equity will depend on the type of business, its current situation and the owner's credibility. Too much debt is not good for the business, and neither is losing control to equity investors. The right balance needs to be found, and this debt-equity ratio is different for different kinds of industries.

On a related note, it helps to have more options on how to use it to maximize the impact of the financing on the business. For instance, instead of purchasing equipment outright, it may be beneficial to consider equipment leasing finance. There are many more such things that need to be considered, and it is best to consult a lawyer or trusted banker for more information regarding suitable options for small business finance.

Types of Innovation

Famous Writer

Creativity can be defined as problem identification and idea generation whilst innovation can be defined as idea selection, development and commercialisation.

There are other useful definitions in this field, for example, creativity can be defined as consisting of a number of ideas, a number of diverse ideas and a number of novel ideas.

There are distinct processes that enhance problem identification and idea generation and, similarly, distinct processes that enhance idea selection, development and commercialisation. Whilst there is no sure fire route to commercial success, these processes improve the probability that good ideas will be generated and selected and that investment in developing and commercialising those ideas will not be wasted.

Types of Innovation

Tidd et al (2005) argue that there are four types of innovation; consequently the innovator has four pathways to investigate when searching for good ideas:

a) Product Innovation – new products or improvements on products. The new Mini or the updated VX Beetle, new models of mobile phones and so on.

b) Process Innovation – where some part of the process is improved to bring benefit. Just in Time is a good example.

c) Positioning Innovation – Lucozade used to be a medicinal drink but the was repositioned as a sports drink.

d) Paradigm Innovation – where major shifts in thinking cause change. During the time of the expensive mainframe, Bill Gates and others aimed to provide a home computer for everyone.

These and other topics are covered in depth in the MBA dissertation on Managing Creativity & Innovation, which can be purchased (along with an Innovation Bible, Creativity and Innovation DIY Audit, Good Idea Generator Software and Power Point Presentation) from http://www.managing-creativity.com/

You can also receive a regular, free newsletter by entering your email address at this site.

Kal Bishop, MBA

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