Tag: Actress

Famous and Not So Famous Dog Posters From Yesteryear

Temple of Apollo Delfi

Snoopy, Lassie, Marmaduke, Beethoven, UnderDog, and even Huckleberry Hound all had their moment in the sun over the years. Some were flashes in the pan and others have become societal icons. Dog posters of these characters are easy to find, but what about some of the more obscure canine companions? For every superstar, there were at least ten not so famous pups that could use a little recognition. Some of them have become enduring symbols and others are just what they are supposed to be, man's best friend, ever by our side and never seeking recognition for their achievements.

Since the beginning of the Twentieth Century, there have been films and famous artists portraying dogs of all breeds doing heroic and humorous things that have made them worthy of at least a mention. Before 1900, there were artists who painted dogs, some of what became famous for other works. That also happened in recent years, as you'll read below. If you're a dog lover and trivia buff, this is one list you'll definitely want to check out. It's not numbered or ranked, because there's no way to rate one dog as somehow more important than others. It is however, a list of important furry four-legged friends who have quietly made history. You will definitely be surprised by some of the little known facts contained here.

Rover's Real Name was Blair

Hollywood has glamorized dogs since they first started making movies back in the early Twentieth Century. In 1905, a silent film called Rescued by Rover depicted a heroic collie saving an infant from a beggar woman who kidnapped her while the family nanny was distracted and speaking to a handsome soldier. The film is widely considered to be the first movie of any kind to use paid actors. The nanny, the soldier, and the beggar woman were all given half a guinea to play their roles. The film was so successful that the filmmaker, Britain's Cecil Hepworth, had to shoot it twice. The negative from the first shooting wore out after several shows. In both versions, Hepworth used his family dog ​​and his own infant child. The dog's name was not Rover. It was Blair.

Where Would Annie have been Without Sandy?

Little Orphan Annie, a popular comic strip character created by Harold Gray, first appeared in print on August 5, 1924 and was published illegally uninterrupted until June 13, 2010. During that time, she was loved and hated, respected and scorned, pitied and envied, but there was always one constant – her dog Sandy. Like any good canine companion, Sandy stand around her through thick and thin, never wavering even when Gray's politics transformed to sink their fledgling career. During their radio years, from 1930 to 1942, Sandy had a speaking role in the intro and a regular spot during the fifteen minute afternoon show. Who did Sandy's voice? Beginning in 1936, it was a little known NBC employee named Orson Welles. He was twenty years old when he was first hired for the part, just two years before his famous War of the Worlds broadcast.

Mike, Fritzi, Rags, Bozo, or Homer?

Most people have seen the movie dog poster from Disney's 1955 animated film Lady and the Tramp, and most just assume the stray's name is simply "The Tramp". There are friendly families that feed him and call him Mike or Fritzi, but neither of those is his real name. During the film, he is not specifically addressed by any title other than "The Tramp". The cast of the film, those who did the voices, experimented with a number of different tags, including Rags and Bozo, but chose not to assign the poor pup one when the film was finally released. For those of you who are trivia buffs, his real name, the one that they wrote into the original script, is Homer. Why is this historic? Homer and his pals were all part of the first animated feature filmed in CinemaScope Widescreen, a revolutionary look that would change the scope of filmmaking for the decades that followed – the 1960s and 70s.

Andy Warhol and Maurice

Andy Warhol was an American painter and filmmaker who 1963 painting The Eight Elvies sold for a record $ 100 million. The purchase made Warhol a legend, on par with Pablo Picasso and Jackson Pollock. The painting, which is a silkscreen, is a portrait of Elvis Presley which was owned at the time of the sale by Italian art collector Annibale Berlingieri. The buyer is unknown. Warhol also produced another painting called, Portrait of Maurice, a depiction of a dachshund that belonged to friend and fellow art collector Gabrielle Keiller. You can find reproductions of Maurice anywhere where dog posters are sold for as little as $ 10 apiece. You will not however, find him listed on any of the many internet lists of famous Warhol's, but total sales of the image far exceeded the selling price of The Eight Elvises. It sees that small amounts really do add up over time.

Toto – The Dog Who Saw in Color

They say that dogs see in black and white, but there's one dog on this list that definitely saw things in color, at least once the house finally landed in the merry old land of Oz. Toto, one of the most celebrated dog poster dogs of all time, was the first Canis Lupus Familiaris to set foot in Munchkinland and will be forever immortalized because of it. The movie itself is ranked as the most watched of all time and was credited with finally bringing vivid color into the filmmaking industry. Toto, however, was not the dog's real name, nor was he the male dog that Frank Baum created him to be. Toto was played by a female black Cairn terrier named "Terry" and she was a professional actress. She was paid $ 125 a week, which was $ 75 more than each of the munchkins made, and she broke her foot during production when one of the witch's guards stepped on it. Her owners, no doubt influenced by the film's popularity, changed her name to Toto in real life after the film's release in 1939. She lived to be eleven and is the only dog ​​on this list to have her own "autobiography", written by Willard Carroll.

Copyright (c) 2010 Trey Markel

Her Most Famous Painting (Oriental Poppies) – Georgia O’Keeffe

THE OLD VILLAGE ON THE ROCK

The American painter Georgia O’Keeffe (November 1887-March 1986) was a pioneering ‘Modernist.’ Her unique approach defied all the accepted norms of painting and gave a new definition to the ‘American Modern Art.’ Owing to her competence, American Art attained fame and recognition in creatively competent Europe. Flowers fascinated Georgia and they were her favorite subject on canvas. O’Keeffe painted “Oriental Poppies” in 1928. This stunning work was declared a groundbreaking, art masterpiece.

Georgia O’Keeffe described her painting as a product of what she perceived in her mind and felt in her heart. In “Oriental Poppies,” she depicts two giant poppy flowers. Measuring 30″ x 40″, this oil painting is an explosion of brilliant colors on a vast canvas, lending a mesmerizing effect. O’Keefe used dazzling red and orange as the main color of the petals. The hollowed centre and the inner contours of the flowers are painted in deep purple. The skillful shading and velvety finish of the petals accentuates the vibrancy of the flowers. “Oriental Poppies” almost looks like a close up photograph. O’Keeffe did not give any background to the painting, to artfully draw focus onto the flowers. The absence of context in the painting presents them in a new light as pure abstracts. “Oriental Poppies” exudes a startling pull, as if casting a hypnotic spell on the viewer.

Georgia O’Keeffe believed that due to the fast-paced lives people live, they merely glance at flowers, but never really observed their exquisiteness. She wished to give such rushing people experience and the feel of the true beauty of flowers. In her words, “If I could paint the flower exactly as I see it no one would see what I see because I would paint it small like the flower is small. So I said to myself – I’ll paint what I see – what the flower is to me but I’ll paint it big and they will be surprised into taking time to look at it – I will make even busy New Yorkers take time to see what I see of flowers.” O’Keeffe chose to paint on a huge canvas with an outburst of bold colors, to astonish the viewers and to introduce them to the wonder of nature. In her bid, she managed to capture the essence of poppies with eloquence.

Many art researchers believed that O’Keeffe’s “Oriental Poppies” was an answer to the zoomed in technique adapted by Alfred Stieglitz in ‘Modern Photography.’ The magnificent painting speaks volumes of O’Keefe’s talent and artistic vision. Georgia’s delightful representation of two ordinary flowers generated widespread admiration and was considered as one of her most memorable works. It is now a part of a collection at the University of Minnesota Art Museum, Minneapolis.

Stay in the Zone

[ Verde que te quiero Verdi ]⠀ “Verde Viento. Verdes Ramas…” As quoted by famous writer Garcia Lorca “Green, I love you green. Green breeze. Green Branch.” Green: the color where it all starts, the color of Verdi. (In this photo, leaves of the fique plant

People often complain about not having enough time. Whether it’s getting out of going to the gym or abandoning treasured dreams, it’s a popular excuse. I sympathise, even though they’re lying.

Time? You have plenty of time – more than you know what to do with. It’s easy enough to prove. How much do you know about the last season of reality TV? Or are video games more your speed? Are you going out with friends a little more often than you should?

You want to enjoy life, I get it. Well, sort of. Writing is part of my dream life and I enjoy it more than wasting time. I crave following my purpose more than I crave distractions from it. And, wow, look at all the time I find for it. If something is important to you, then you can do the same.

But if you say that you work all day and come home exhausted, so what’s wrong with a little TV? Now we’re getting closer to the truth. That’s not a shortage of time, though – it’s a shortage of energy. Why is it acceptable to say you don’t have time (“I’m bad at prioritising every day!”) but running out of energy (“I have biological limits!”) is taboo?

Forget taboos. We’re here to solve a problem. Add an hour to most people’s days and that’s another hour of TV. Ramp up their energy by 10%, though, and you have a whole different person.

The truth shall set you free.

I won’t tell you all the ways to increase your energy. You know the most effective ones – sleep well, eat better, exercise. (Don’t tell me you don’t have time to do these. There’s that word again. And you have enough energy for them because they create energy). Instead, let’s look at things from a hypnotist’s perspective.

In my quest to better fathom my body and mind, I’ve made mistakes. A recent one was when I threw my nutrient levels out of whack. I’ve corrected it since (and then some) but, for a while, I was lethargic, irritable and unmotivated.

I learned two things from this experience:

One is that even running on empty, I found the energy to write every day. It’s important to me so I made it happen. Mere biological reality wasn’t going to hold me back.

Two, even as out of balance as I was, hypnotising myself made me feel whole. I could stave off the aches and fatigue with nothing but my thoughts.

Mind over matter? That phrase doesn’t come close to capturing it. Mind owns matter.

Some days are a struggle but they don’t have to be. Remember your mission. Why do you want to succeed at whatever you chose? Or whatever chose you, perhaps? Your perfect future won’t find you from where you are. It takes commitment to even meet it halfway, to get within line of sight of it. I’m not telling you this to pump you up – if it’s your purpose, then the commitment is easy.

If you had asked me to write 500 words a day, seven days a week, I would have choked. How would I even come up with that many ideas? Yet here I am, sailing well past the 500-word mark without even thinking about it. It’s because I’m driven. So are you, for the things that matter.

Having a purpose is the ultimate lifestyle upgrade. It forces you to dig deeper, think deeper and live deeper. And it’s easy! That’s the shocking part – how natural discipline is when it aligns with what you truly want. What’s harder is getting started, though, so once you know what you want to do, work towards it every day. You’ll quickly find that breaks are harder than working.

How And When To Use Por, Para and Porque in Spanish

View of Sissinghurst Castle Garden, created by Vita Sackville-West

Some beginner students (and advanced) usually have some problems with when they should use POR, PARA or PORQUE and it can be one of the most frustrating topics to learn in all of Spanish. In this lesson we are going to review some rules to recognize when we should use one or another.

We use POR when we want to speak about the reason behind something. In this case you have to use a noun after POR.

POR + Noun: “Me gusta Buenos Aires por el clima.” (I like Buenos Aires because of the weather.)

“Como pollo por las proteínas que tiene.” (I eat chicken because it has protein.)

In Spanish you should use PARA when you are speaking about the objective of an action or the objective of an object. In this case you will use the verb in the infinitive form. PARA + Infinitive Verb: “Ahorro dinero para viajar a otro pais”. (I save money to travel to another country.)/ “El lapiz sirve para escribir.” (The pencil is used to write.).

Finally, we use Porque when you are speaking about the reason of something, but instead of using just the infinitive of the verb, we use the conjugation of the verb.

PORQUE + Conjugated Verb: “Voy a comprarme ropa nueva porque quiero estar elegante esta noche”.

(I am going to buy new clothes because I want to be elegant tonight.)

So, when someone asks you: “Por que estudias espanol?”

(Why do you study Spanish?), you can answer in different ways:

Por mi trabajo. (Because of my job.)

Por el crecimiento del mercado latino. (Because of the growth of the Latin market.)

Para poder comunicarme con personas que hablan espanol. (To be able to communicate with people who speak Spanish.)

Para viajar por Sudamerica. (For travelling around South America.)

Porque me gusta. (Because I like it.)

Porque quiero conseguir un trabajo mejor. (Because I want to find a better job.)

This little lesson doesn’t cover all aspects of when to use POR, PARA and PORQUE, but it should give you a good start at understanding some important differences of when they are used. Be on the lookout for more lessons about POR, PARA Y PORQUE in the future.

I will end this lesson by mentioning a couple of learning Spanish tools that you can use to increase your knowledge about this topic. The Practice Makes Perfect books are among the best for learning Spanish. There are currently about a dozen books in the Practice Makes Perfect series, covering various topic from vocabulary to grammar. Another one that I have recommended to my students is the Learning Spanish Like Crazy audio course which teaches informal or familiar Spanish, but not slang.