Category: Famous

The Most Popular Fiction Authors in America By Number of Sales

agy 01 by aminius:))

It may shock you to know that there is no single repository of statistics for the number of books sold by an author. Likewise, there is no keeper of records on the sales of a particular book title. (Registering your book with the Library of Congress only protects the copyright. The library does not track sales.)

Authors or publishers get an International Standard Book Number (ISBN) that is unique to each book format. Thus, a title may have several ISBNs attached to it, one for hardback, one for paperback and one for an ebook. Writers may change publishers, and publishers may change their names, merge or disappear. Multiply this complexity by the sales made worldwide, and you can understand why the following figures have a tremendous margin for error.

This list includes only American fiction authors, who have sold over an estimated 100 million books. William Shakespeare and Agatha Christie, both Brits, are by far the largest individual sellers of books with an estimated 2-4 billion. Yes, that is billion with a capital B. Keep in mind that the numbers refer to the complete works of an author (including co-written works) and not a specific title.

The list is fluid in that younger authors will no doubt improve their rankings over their careers. Likewise, as populations and communications have increased, so has the exposure of these authors to an increasing audience. The added popularity gained when a book is made into a movie or television show can cause sales and rankings to soar.

The prolific series of children's or young adult books by RL Stine, Ann M. Martin, Stan and Jan Berenstein, Richard Scarry, Gilbert Patten or Norman Bridwell (from 400 to 80 titles each) average just 2 million units per title. Taken as a body of work, each of these writers has sold over 110 million books. Dr. Seuss wrote just 44 books with the same rate of sales and like Stine and Patten are in the top ten. Only one nineteenth century writer, specializing in rags-to-riches stories about young boys, is in the top ten. Horatio Alger wrote 135 dime novels.

Although only ten American women (one of those, Jan Berenstein co-wrote with her husband) made the top forty, a woman, Danielle Steel, came in at number one. She has sold between 500-800 million romance books and has written about 120 titles. Other best selling romance writers include Janet Dailey, Nora Roberts, Debbie Macomber and the youngest and least prolific author, Stephanie Meyer of Twilight fame. Other women in the top forty include gothic / horror author VC Andrews, which works are now ghost written by a man; Anne Rice, the queen of vampires; suspense writer Mary Higgins Clark; and forensic writer Patricia Cornwell.

Two Western authors made the top twenty. Louis L'Amour and Zane Gray have both sold over 230 million books. L'Amour is credited with over 101 books, while Zane Gray's count is unclear. Publishers sold about 24 of his books after his death in 1939, but a conservative estimate is around 55 titles.

Only one other American has done as well as Stephanie Meyer when it comes to selling the most books with the least number of titles. His name is Dan Brown. Thanks to Tom Hanks ( The DaVinci Code ) he has sold over 120 million books with just 5 titles. Likewise, only one name on the list is someone you may study in an American literature course. His name is Erskine Caldwell. You may have heard of his books, including Tobacco Road and God's Little Acre .

Mystery, suspense, thriller and private detective genres are often grouped together in the minds of readers. Together they represent the largest group of bestselling authors. Sidney Sheldon of television fame, Irving Wallace, champion of the underdog, and Mickey Spillane of the Mike Hammer series, have all reached their high rankings with roughly 25 titles. David Baldacci is gaining in rank with 25 titles of his own to date. The more fruitful authors include Dean Koontz, James Patterson and Evan Hunter (aka Ed McBain), all of hover hover around the 100 mark. Straddling the middle ground of productivity with 50 titles is Rex Stout, famous for his Nero Wolfe series.

Legal and medical mysteries / thrillers are taken out for their occupational themes. John Grisham with 33 titles and Earl Stanley Gardner with 140 titles are the most noteworthy for their sales. Gardner, the Perry Mason writer may someday get surpassed in books sold given Grisham's continuing movie adaptations. In the medical field Robin Cook has 27 titles, while Frank G. Slaughter wrote 62 books before his death.

There are two top-forty writers who fall under the adventure genre. Harold Robbins has sold over 750 million books with just 23 titles. Clive Cussler has 37 books with less than 150 million in sales. Cussler, L'Amour and Gray are what many women consider romance writers for men.

Some writers just do not fit any mold. They not only stand out in their own unique way, but also define their genre. Among these are horror / fantasy writer Stephen King with 70 books to his credit and spy writer Robert Ludlum with 40 books. Michael Crichton of The Andromeda Strain and Jurassic Park is considered a techno-thriller / science fiction author. He wrote 25 books. James Michener had 47 titles to his historical fiction credit.

One last author that may surprise you wrote about 70 books, many in the science fiction and fantasy genres. He was eager to exploit his most popular fictional character, who has become an American icon. He even set up his own printing operation to publish his books. He became one of the oldest war correspondents in WWII and died in 1950. You may have heard of him, Edgar Rice Burroughs. If not, surely you've heard of his famous jungle character, Tarzan.

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Why Hire Freelance Writers?

Laguna di Caorle

Introduction:
Your web site is your virtual calling card. In many cases, this may be the only chance you have to make a good impression on your potential customer. If you really think about it, this is the most important content that you will show the public. Certainly, having great content that makes the right impression is valuable to you? This is the main reason why you should consider hiring a freelance writer to help with all of your content creation needs.

Writing Can Be Difficult:
One of the best reasons to hire a freelance writer is because writing can be difficult. This is especially true when the task involves something as important as content for your web site. If someone told you to sit down and write 1,000 words about marketing, could you do it? Some can, but most people would have a difficult time doing this.

Many studies have shown that writing in a competent manner is something most people do not feel they can accomplish. On the other hand, a freelance writer is someone whose business IS writing. They write every day, all day. For them, writing is not difficult at all; it is a pleasure.

No Time to Write:
Most business owners are busy. There always seems to be something else to do and not enough time to do it. Even if the basics of your particular writing task or project are simple, it may not be easy to put them all together. This is especially true with copywriting and content creation.

If you want content for your site, hiring a freelance writer is an excellent investment. Your time will be freed up to focus on what you do best-running your business. Whether you want a single page written (or re-written) or regular content updates, a freelance writer will save you time.

Improved Search Engine Rankings:
An experienced freelance writer can develop content that is optimized to help your site rank well in the search engines. Granted, not every type of freelance writer is capable of this type of work. However, a good SEO freelance writer or copywriter is worth their weight in gold.

Having content on your site which is SEO focused can accomplish a number of goals. It will give you better positioning in the search engines and an increased number of visitors to your site. Additionally, the pages on your site will even convert more of those visitors into buyers, making you more money.

Makes Your Site More Effective:
Many sites that are written without the aid of a professional writer seem to meander. They are unfocused. A professional freelance web writer will understand how to motivate people to take action. Your site will be clear, focused and have a definite purpose

Bottom Line:
Hiring a freelance writer can be the best investment you make in your business. Your improved web site copy and content will help improve your search engine rankings, increase your traffic and improve sales.

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Rhetorical Devices in the Inaugural Address of John F. Kennedy

Magical Places and Things -Egypt- The Nile (7)

It is according to Aristotle that a speaker or writer has three ways to persuade his audience: The first kind depends on the personal character of the speaker; the second is on putting the audience into a certain frame of mind; the third is on the proof, or apparent proof, provided by the words of the speech itself.

One of the most influential people who made a memorable speech for the past century is President John F. Kennedy, a famous public speaker who wrote an inaugural address that contains a power to persuade a lot of people.

His well-known speech shows how his method of using the art of persuasive written or spoken discourse (Rhetoric) that an author or speaker uses to convey a meaning to the listener or reader contributes to the purpose or theme of his message for his countrymen.

Definition of Terms:

1. Alliteration: Repetition of consonant sounds at the beginning of words that are close to one another.

2. Allusion: A brief or indirect reference to a person, place, event, or passage in a work of literature or the Bible assumed to be sufficiently well known to be recognized by the reader.

3. Amplification: An expansion of detail to clarify a point.

4. Analogy: A comparison between two things in which the more complex is explained in terms of the more simple.

5. Anaphora: Repetition of one or more words at the head of consecutive phrases, clauses, or sentences.

6. Anastrophe: Inversion of word order to mark emphasis.

7. Antimetabole: Reverasal or repeated words or phrases for effect.

8. Antithesis: Contrast within parallel phrases (not to be confused with the ordinary use of the word to mean “extreme opposite”).

9. Assonance: Repetition of vowel sounds between different consonants.

10. Asyndeton: Absence of conjunctions.

11. Chiasmus: The reversal of grammatical order from one phrase to the next.

12. Climax: Consists of arranging words, clauses, or sentences in the order of increasing importance, weight, or emphasis.

13. Conduplication: Resembles anadiplosis in the repetition of a preceding word, but it repeats a key word (not just the last word) from a preceding phrase, clause, or sentence, at the beginning of the next.

14. Consonance: Repetition of identical consonant sounds within two or more words in close proximity.

15. Ellipsis: Any omitted part of speech that is easily understood in context.

16. Ethos: Makes use of what an audience values and believes to be good or true.

17. Hyperbole: Deliberate exaggeration in order to create humor or emphasis.

18. Imagery: Lively descriptions which impress the images of things upon the mind using one or more of the five senses.

19. Logos: appealing to reason in a measured, logical way.

20. Metanoia: The qualification of a statement to either diminish or strengthen its tone.

21. Metaphor: Meaning or identity ascribed to one subject by way of another.

22. Oxymoron: Contraditory terms or ideas are combined.

23. Parallelism: The technique of arranging words, phrases, clauses, or larger structures by placing them side by side and making them similar in form.

24. Paradox: A statement that seems to contradict itself but that turns out to have a rational meaning.

25. Pathos: Appealing to the emotions.

26. Personification: The attribution of human qualities to a nonhuman or inanimate object.

27. Polysyndeton: Insertion of conjunctions before each word in a list.

28. Repetition: Word or phrase used two or more times in close proximity.

29. Rhetorical Question: A question asked for rhethorical effect to emphasize a point, no answer being expected.

30. Sententia: The punctuation of a point with an aphorism.

31. Syntax: The grammatical structure of a sentence; the arrangement of words in a sentence.

32. Tricolon: A series of parallel words, phrases, clauses, or statements.

33. Zeugma: Includes several similar rhetorical devices, all involving a grammatically correct linkage (or yoking together) of two or more parts of speech by another part of speech.

Rhetorical Devices That Are Present In The Inaugural Address of John F. Kennedy:

*Alliteration

• “same solemn” (2nd sentence of the 2nd paragraph)

• “man holds in his mortal hands” (1st sentence of the 3rd paragraph)

• “for which our forebears fought” (2nd sentence of 3rd paragraph)

• “to friend and foe alike” (4th paragraph)

• “whether it wishes us well or ill” (5th paragraph)

• “Pay any price, bear any burden… ” (5th paragraph)

• “the survival and the success of liberty” (5th paragraph)

• “faithful friends” (1st sentence of the 7th paragraph)

• “colonial control” (1st sentence of the 8th paragraph)

• “strongly supporting” (2nd sentence of the 8th paragraph)

• “break the bonds of mass misery” (9th paragraph)

• “sovereign states” (11th paragraph)

• “its writ may run” (11th paragraph)

• “the dark powers of destruction” (12th paragraph)

• “steady spread” (14th paragraph)

• “sincerity is always subject” (15th paragraph)

• “peace preserved” (9th to the last paragraph)

• “bear the burden” (6th to the last paragraph)

• “a grand and global alliance” (5th to the last paragraph)

• “high standards of strength and sacrifice” (1st sentence of the last paragraph)

• “Let us go forth to lead the land we love… ” (2nd sentence of the last paragraph)

*Allusion

• “I have sworn before you and Almighty God.” (2nd sentence of the 2nd paragraph)

• “those who foolishly sought power by riding the back of the tiger ended up inside” (last sentence of the 8th paragraph)

*Amplification

• “Let both sides… Let both sides… Let both sides… Let both sides (Paragraphs 16 to 19)

*Analogy

• “those who foolishly sought power by riding the back of the tiger ended up inside” (3rd sentence of the 8th paragraph)

*Anaphora

• “all forms of human poverty and all forms of human life” (1st sentence of the 3rd paragraph)

• “not because the communists may be doing it, not because we seek their votes, but because it is right” (1st sentence of the 9th paragraph)

• “To those old allies… To those new states… To those people… To our sister… To that world… to those nations… ” (Paragraphs 7 to 12)

• “We shall not always expect to find them supporting our view. But we shall always hope to find them strongly supporting their own freedom” (2nd and 3rd sentences of the 8th paragraph)

• “both sides overburdened by the cost of modern weapons, both rightly alarmed by the steady spread of the deadly atom, yet both racing to alter that uncertain balance of terror that stays the hand of mankind’s final war” (14th paragraph)

• “Let both sides… Let both sides… Let both sides… Let both sides” (Paragraphs 16 to 19)

• “not as a call to bear arms, though arms we need–not as a call to battle, though embattled we are–but a call to bear the burden of a long twilight struggle, year in and year out” (6th to the last paragraph)

• “the first one hundred days. Nor will it be finished in the first one thousand days, nor in the life of this Administration, nor even perhaps in our lifetime on this planet” (8th to the last paragraph)

*Anastrophe

• “Dare not” (1st sentence of the 4th paragraph and 13th paragraph & 3rd sentence of the 7th paragraph)

• “This much we pledge” (6th paragraph)

• “Ask not” (26th paragraph)

*Antimetabole

• “Ask not what your country can do for you–ask what you can do for your country.” (3rd to the last paragraph)

• “Let us never negotiate out of fear. But let us never fear to negotiate.” (2nd sentence of the 15th paragraph)

*Antithesis

• “We observe today not a victory of party but a celebration of freedom–symbolizing an end as well as a beginning signifying renewal as well as change. ” (1st sentence of the 2nd paragraph)

• “… not from the generosity of the state but from the hand of God.” (2nd sentence of the 3rd paragraph)

• “Support any friend, oppose any foe… ” (5th paragraph)

• “United there is little we cannot do in a host of cooperative ventures. Divided there is little we can do… ” (2nd sentence of the 7th paragraph)

• “Not because… not because… but because… ” (1st sentence of the 9th paragraph)

• “Let us never negotiate out of fear, but let us never fear to negotiate.” (2nd sentence of the 15th paragraph)

• “Let both sides explore what problems unite us instead of belaboring those problems which divide us.” (16th paragraph)

• “not a new balance of power, but a new world of law” (20th paragraph)

• “Not as a call to bear arms… not as a call to battle.. but a call to bear the burden… ” (23rd paragraph)

• “I do not shrink from this responsibility–I welcome it.” (2nd sentence of the 25th paragraph)

• “… ask not what you country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country.” (26th paragraph)

• “ask not what America will do for you, but what together we can do for the freedom of man” (2nd to the last paragraph)

*Assonance

• “… the steady spread of the deadly atom.” (14th paragraph)

*Asyndeton

• “We shall pay any price, bear any burden, meet any hardship, support any friend, oppose any foe… ” (5th paragraph)

• “explore the stars, conquer the deserts, eradicate disease, tap the ocean depths” (2nd sentence of the 18th paragraph)

• “The energy, the faith, the devotion” (4th to the last paragraph)

*Chiasmus

• “Let us never negotiate out of fear. But let us never fear to negotiate.” (2nd sentence of the 15th paragraph)

• “ask not what your country can do for you–ask what you can do for your country” (3rd to the last paragraph)

*Climax

• “All this will not be finished in the first one hundred days. Nor will it be finished in the first one thousand days, nor in the life of this Administration, nor even perhaps in our lifetime on this planet.” (8th to the last paragraph)

*Conduplication

• “to help them help themselves” (1st sentence of the 9th paragraph)

• “good words into good deeds” (1st sentence of the 10th paragraph)

• “free men and free governments” (1st sentence of the 10th paragraph)

• “the instruments of war have far outpaced the instruments of peace” (11th paragraph)

• “absolute power… absolute control… ” (17th paragraph)

*Consonance

• “Whether it wishes us well or ill, that we shall… ” (5th paragraph)

*Ellipsis

• “This much we pledge–and more.” (6th paragraph)

*Ethos

• “Vice President Johnson, Mr. Speaker, Mr. Chief Justice, President Eisenhower, Vice President Nixon, President Truman, Reverend Clergy, fellow citizens: We observe today not a victory of party but a celebration of freedom–symbolizing an end as well as a beginning–signifying renewal as well as change.” (Paragraphs 1 & 2)

• “In the long history of the world, only a few generations have been granted the role of defending freedom in its hour of maximum danger. I do not shrink from this responsibility–I welcome it.” (4th to the last paragraph)

• “With a good conscience our only sure reward, with history the final judge of our deeds, let us go forth to lead the land we love, asking His blessing and His help, but knowing that here on earth God’s work must truly be our own.” (last sentence of the last paragraph)

*Hyperbole

• “Let every nation know, whether it wishes us well or ill, that we shall pay any price, bear any burden, meet any hardship, support any friend, oppose any foe to assure the survival and the success of liberty.” (5th paragraph)

*Imagery

• “The torch has been passed to a new generation of Americans.” (4th paragraph)

*Logos

• “old allies whose cultural and spiritual origins we share” (1st sentence of the 7th paragraph)

• “new states whom we welcome to the ranks of the free” (1st sentence of the 8th paragraph)

• “people in the huts and villages of half the globe struggling to break the bonds of mass misery” (1st sentence of the 9th paragraph)

• “that world assembly of sovereign states, the United Nations” (11th paragraph)

• “nations who would make themselves our adversary” (12th paragraph)

*Metanoia

• “Now the trumpet summons us again–not as a call to bear arms, though arms we need–not as a call to battle, though embattled we are–but a call to bear the burden of a long twilight struggle, year in and year out, “rejoicing in hope, patient in tribulation”–a struggle against the common enemies of man: tyranny, poverty, disease and war itself.” (6th to the last paragraph)

*Metaphor

• “We are the heirs of the first revolution.” (1st sentence of the 4th paragraph)

• “Let the word go forward from this time and place, to friend and foe alike, that the torch has been passed to a new generation of Americans… ” (2nd sentence of the 4th paragraph)

• “riding the back of the tiger” (3rd sentence of the 8th paragraph)

• “the bonds of mass misery” (9th paragraph)

• “the chains of poverty” (1st sentence of the 10th paragraph)

• “evolution of hope” (2nd sentence of the 10th paragraph)

• “master of its own house” (last sentence of the 10th paragraph)

• “balance of terror” (14th paragraph)

• “And if a beachhead of cooperation may push back the jungle of suspicion… ” (20th paragraph)

• “The energy, the faith, the devotion which we bring to this endeavor will light our country and all who serve it–and the glow from that fire can truly light the world.” (4th to the last paragraph)

*Oxymoron

• “But this peaceful revolution.” (2nd sentence of the 10th paragraph)

*Parallelism

• “We observe today not a victory of party but a celebration of freedom–symbolizing an end as well as a beginning signifying renewal as well as change.” (1st sentence of the 2nd paragraph)

• “born in this century, tempered by war, disciplined by a hard and bitter peace, proud of our ancient heritage” (2nd sentence of the 4th paragraph)

• “Let every nation know, whether it wishes us well or ill, that we shall pay any price, bear any burden, meet any hardship, support any friend, oppose any foe to assure the survival and the success of liberty.” (5th paragraph)

• “Let both sides explore what problems unite us… Let both sides, for the first time, formulate serious and precise proposals for the inspection and control of arms… Let both sides seek to invoke the wonders of science… Let both sides unite… ” (Paragraphs 6 to 9)

• “United there is little we cannot do in a host of cooperative ventures. Divided there is little we can do… ” (2nd and 3rd sentences of the 7th paragraph)

• “If a free society cannot help the many who are poor, it cannot save the few who are rich.” (2nd sentence of the 9th paragraph)

• “sufficient beyond doubt can we be certain beyond” (2nd sentence of the 13th paragraph)

*Paradox

• “Only when our arms are sufficient beyond doubt can we be certain beyond doubt that they will never be employed.” (2nd sentence of the 13th paragraph)

*Pathos

• “To those people in the huts and villages of half the globe struggling to break the bonds of mass misery… ” (1st sentence of the 9th paragraph)

• “he graves of young Americans who answered the call toservice surround the globe” (7th to the last paragraph)

• ” The energy, the faith, the devotion which we bring to this endeavor will light our country and all who serve it–and the glow from that fire can truly light the world.” (4th to the last paragraph)

*Personification

• “With history the final judge of our deeds” (2nd sentence of the last paragraph)

*Polysyndeton

• “where the strong are just and the weak secure and the peace preserved” (9th to the last paragraph)

*Repetition

• “For man holds in his mortal hands the power to abolish all forms of human poverty and all forms of human life.” (1st sentence of the 3rd paragraph)

*Rhetorical Question

• “Can we forge against these enemies a grand and global alliance, North and South, East and West, that can assure a more fruitful life for all mankind? Will you join in that historic effort?” (5th to the last paragraph)

*Sententia

• “undo the heavy burdens… (and) let the oppressed go free” (19th paragraph)

*Syntax

• “My fellow citizens of the world: ask not what America will do for you, but what together we can do for the freedom of man.” (2nd to the last paragraph)

*Tricolon

• “We observe today not a victory of party but a celebration of freedom–symbolizing an end as well as a beginning signifying renewal as well as change.” (1st sentence of the 2nd paragraph)

• “not as a call to bear arms, though arms we need–not as a call to battle, though embattled we are–but a call to bear the burden of a long twilight struggle, year in and year out” (6th to the last paragraph)

*Zeugma

• “Now the trumpet summons us again–not as a call to bear arms, though arms we need–not as a call to battle, though embattled we are–but a call to bear the burden… ” (6th to the last paragraph)

Encapsulation of Findings:

John F. Kennedy used 33 different types of rhetorical devices in his inaugural speech. The most dominant rhetorical device that he used was the usage of alliteration.

Conclusion:

Through extensive analysis, it can be seen that it is evident that he has a goal of getting the audience’s attention to listen and to understand his points in a meaningful way in the fields of writing and speaking.

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All About Freelance Ghostwriting Jobs

Il mare dei Malavoglia

The term "ghostwriting" refers to writing for someone that you do not receive credit for. Famous people, for example, seldom write their own autobiographies. Instead, they hire a ghostwriter to tell their story for them.

Why would a freelance ghostwriter agree to forfeit credit for his or her work? Simple: money. Clients usually pay ghostwriters far more than a "normal" writer's fee of $ 20- $ 50 an hour. Small books (150 pages or less) usually cost a client at least $ 25,000. Fees go up from there depending on the length and type of book, as well as the amount of research required by the ghostwriter.

The fees are high because you can not slap your byline on the work and you forfeit all rights to royalties that your book generates. The exceptions are if the client agreements to put your name in print on the cover, name you as a co-author, or offer you part of the royalties. In those cases, you would often give a hefty discount depending on the return you expected.

What types of books can I ghostwrite?

Many industries seek the skills of freelance ghostwriters. Fiction and children's writing are common – people often have (or think they have) an amazing storyline, but lack the writing ability to sell it.

Freelance ghostwriters often pen non-fiction books, such as autobiographies and instructional, business, and self-help books. Sometimes these ghostwriters are experts in the subject matter, sometimes they are not. You may have to do a lot of research, or none at all.

You can also ghostwrite for smaller projects, like articles and web content. These do not usually pay more than normal writing but they're good resume builders.

Where can I find freelance ghostwriting gigs?

Set up a website to promote your freelance ghostwriting services. Because ghostwriting is expensive, it's important to buyers that you are really a ghostwriting professional. Presenting yourself with a polished website is a great way to emphasize your credibility.

It is more than possible to find ghostwriting jobs on freelancing websites, but buyers there are usually less knowledgeable and therefore less willing to pay good money. It is common to see ads for a 250-page book that needs writing with a budget of $ 500 or less. It does not hurt to keep your eye out for a gem though – it does happen occasionally.

What skills do I need to be a freelance ghostwriter?

If you have experience, you're off to a great start. If you lack experience, thumb through your files to see if you can use some of that as writing examples, or write some from scratch. You do not have to ghostwrite it to prove your writing skills. If you have a particular client in mind, do your best to match your writing style and samples to the type of writing you think your client is looking for.

Remember that any samples you send can not be ghostwritten work. Without otherwise specified in the agreement, you can not ever dislose that you're the author behind ghostwritten work. In these cases, feel free to describe the book you ghostwrote and how well it's doing.

How should I respond to a ghostwriting ad?

If you find a promising ad (or if someone contacts you), respond professionally using perfect grammar and polite language. For practice, try responding to this sample ad:

I'm looking for someone to write a book about choosing the right family pet. I have an outline and some research but a little more will be required. The book should only be about 100 pages. I will own all rights afterwards. Serious writers only.

What should you say to this person? Well, it's good to start off expressing an interest in their subject matter. Ghostwriting projects are usually dear to buyers' hearts, so if you start by saying you're passionate about pets, you'll catch his eye right away.

Next, you'll want to insure him that you can handle the task. If you do not have enough experience to convince him, suggest having him send one chapter outline and writing a sample for him for free. Yes, it's a bit of unpaid work for you, but it will mean thousands of dollars if you get the job.

Finally, quote a fee. The book is short and research appears to be minimal. If you're experienced, quote $ 25,000. If you're not, quote around $ 15,000. It's far less than an experienced ghostwriter would make, but you have to start somewhere. Good luck!

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Famous People

J. M. Barrie, 1892.

Generally speaking, a superstar is someone who seeks media attention and the largest part recently has an vociferous personality. The want to be noticeable is obscure by more or less to be a part of Western culture and more specifically the American Dream as a quantity of accomplishment. A superstar with the aim of shys away from the freely available eye or keeps a very separate secretive life is called a conductor superstar. At the other put an end to of the spectrum, a superstar with the aim of seeks unfashionable publicity instead of him- or herself is often called a media tart, but lone with the aim of uses his or her secretive life as a vehicle instead of enhanced superstar status, now and again desperately, is referred to as media whore. Examples of this are fake or clarify relationships, truth television appearances, superstar nudity and in extreme hand baggage, scandal or superstar sexual characteristics tapes.

There are a broad range of ways make somewhere your home can turn into celebrities, from their profession, appear in the throng media, beauty or even by complete accident or notoriety. Instant superstar is the name with the aim of is used as someone becoming a superstar in very curt era of phase.

Indoors more or less seats, someone with the aim of one way or another achieves a small amount of transient fame through propaganda or throng media, is stereotyped as a B-grade superstar. Often the stereotype extends to someone with the aim of cascade curt of mainstream or persistent fame but seeks to reach or exploit it.

Indoors the 20th Century, the avid freely available lure instead of celebrations and hunger instead of superstar gossip has seen the arise of the gossip correspondent, tabloid, paparazzi and superstar blogging.

Just as lone possibly will turn into a regional or cultural superstar, lone possibly will additionally turn into a superstar in their niche marketplace and hold partial fame apart from it. Stan Lee (best notorious as co-creator of the classic Marvel superheroes) is mostly notorious to comic volume fans and while in last years, he has turned into more well notorious, many outside fandom are still unsure of exactly who he is, other than being a voice.

One possibly will appeal with the aim of all celebrities are niche marketplace celebrities, more or less niches are simply much better than others and many celebrities win fame apart from their niche marketplace as well. A first-rate model can be seen surrounded by the numerous specialized athletes with the aim of are well notorious even surrounded by make somewhere your home who organize not get the gist sports.

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Famous People

Franz Kafka

Generally speaking, a superstar is someone who seeks media attention and the largest part recently has an vociferous personality. The want to be noticeable is obscure by more or less to be a part of Western culture and more specifically the American Dream as a quantity of accomplishment. A superstar with the aim of shys away from the freely available eye or keeps a very separate secretive life is called a conductor superstar. At the other put an end to of the spectrum, a superstar with the aim of seeks unfashionable publicity instead of him- or herself is often called a media tart, but lone with the aim of uses his or her secretive life as a vehicle instead of enhanced superstar status, now and again desperately, is referred to as media whore. Examples of this are fake or clarify relationships, truth television appearances, superstar nudity and in extreme hand baggage, scandal or superstar sexual characteristics tapes.

There are a broad range of ways make somewhere your home can turn into celebrities, from their profession, appear in the throng media, beauty or even by complete accident or notoriety. Instant superstar is the name with the aim of is used as someone becoming a superstar in very curt era of phase.

Indoors more or less seats, someone with the aim of one way or another achieves a small amount of transient fame through propaganda or throng media, is stereotyped as a B-grade superstar. Often the stereotype extends to someone with the aim of cascade curt of mainstream or persistent fame but seeks to reach or exploit it.

Indoors the 20th Century, the avid freely available lure instead of celebrations and hunger instead of superstar gossip has seen the arise of the gossip correspondent, tabloid, paparazzi and superstar blogging.

Just as lone possibly will turn into a regional or cultural superstar, lone possibly will additionally turn into a superstar in their niche marketplace and hold partial fame apart from it. Stan Lee (best notorious as co-creator of the classic Marvel superheroes) is mostly notorious to comic volume fans and while in last years, he has turned into more well notorious, many outside fandom are still unsure of exactly who he is, other than being a voice.

One possibly will appeal with the aim of all celebrities are niche marketplace celebrities, more or less niches are simply much better than others and many celebrities win fame apart from their niche marketplace as well. A first-rate model can be seen surrounded by the numerous specialized athletes with the aim of are well notorious even surrounded by make somewhere your home who organize not get the gist sports.

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His Most Famous Painting (Violin and Candlestick) – Georges Braque

MY SMALL GARDEN UP IN THE SKY

Georges Braque was an eminent twentieth century French painter and sculptor, who was also the co-founder of ‘Cubism.’ Born on May 13, 1882, in Argenteuil-sur-Seine, from 1897 to 1899, he learned painting at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts at Le Havre, the city where he grew up. He commenced his artistic journey, experimenting in styles, such as ‘Impressionism’ and ‘Fauvism,’ before he developed ‘Cubism’ along with Pablo Picasso in 1908. Cezanne’s artistry of ‘multiple perspectives,’ exhibited at Salon d’Automne, in 1907, inspired the duo towards ‘Cubism.’ French art critic Louis Vauxcelles saw a painting by Braque in 1908 and called it ‘Cubism,’ or ‘bizarre cubiques.’ He perceived the artwork as ‘full of little cubes.’ This led to the christening of the Picasso’s and Georges’ invention as ‘Cubism,’ which the duo was not initially excited about. Braque’s magnum opus “Violin and Candlestick,” painted in spring 1910, exemplifies the vibrant persona of the ‘Cubist’ style of painting.

Mostly monochromatic in style and themed on ‘Still Life,’ Braque’s’ ‘Cubist’ works mostly stunned the art community. This 24″ x 19 3/4″ (61cm x 50cm), oil on canvass, “Violin and Candlestick” is a result of the amalgamated slices of music and violin sheets rearranged at atypical angles to create a single intertwined image, with the shifting surface of forms, planes, arcs, and colors. The painting whilst illustrating three-dimensional view of the subjects on a flat canvas, shuns the traditional ‘Renaissance’ perspective. This actually is ‘Cubism,’ which focuses on representing the subjects, as viewed from several angles.

“Violin and Candlestick” was an outcome of Georges’ obsession for form and stability, fuelled with a desire to create an illusion in a viewer’s mind to move around freely within the painting. To achieve this, the painter conglomerated the subjects at the centre of a grid like armature & covered the boundaries of the black-outlined objects using earth-toned colors. Thereby, he managed to transform the volumes of static to hold compound surfaces on a flat plane, enabling onlookers to appreciate more of form compared to any other angle. Recognizing and understanding the effects of light astutely to elicit the appropriate emotions and effects of the subjects also served as a vital parameter for Braque’s “Violin and Candlestick.” He expressed this art of fragmentation as “a technique for getting closer to the object.”

Georges Braque breathed his last on August 31, 1963, in Paris. His masterpiece, “Violin and Candlestick” is exhibited at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.

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Culture

Trieste from Conconello before sunset. Italy [EXPLORE 28/08/2014]

In the present-day world there are few people who reject the phenomenon of globalization. The world is becoming more and more global in the sense that people of various cultures start to communicate more freely. Furthermore there are means to communicate thoughts and ideas across cultures such as television, the internet and so on. Even though it is so common to believe that knowledge, experience, science are capable of transcending all cultural differences, many people lessen the importance of those barriers and oftentimes disregard their existence.

All cultures have a set of beliefs that constitute the code of values and moral laws for that particular culture. In Asia for example people were exposed to certain social phenomena and consequently adopted certain beliefs that now determine their behavior as a separate culture. In other countries people share different beliefs and values due to a variety of factors. Religion is one of the most important factors that shape the society in terms of its cultural beliefs and traditions. Another important component is history that can tell us about the events of the past that might have had some influence on the further development of people in that particular country.

Cultural differences present a very interesting social phenomenon to study and understand. There are cultures that share very similar values and traditions and there are cultures that have very different beliefs. In the confines of this paper, I will focus my attention on the differences between Chinese and American cultures that in my opinion present very good examples for this study. There are myriad differences in all aspects of social activity and there are probably more differences than similarities in these two cultures.

To study a particular culture is virtually to study the people and their behavior from a sociological perspective. It is very important to construct a working definition of a culture. Culture is a set of social norms, traditions, beliefs and values shared by a large group of people . Individuals who belong to that group can be considered a culture. By the same token, they can be called a society because at this point there is not much difference between the two notions. A society is literally a group of people that share that particular set of beliefs, values and so on, whereas the word culture has slightly different connotations. A particular culture may as well be share by more than one nation whereas the word society is usually applicable to the nation that inhabits a particular country. There are slight differences between these two terms but most sociologists and anthropologists use them interchangeably.

In other words, a culture is a set of beliefs or a particular ideology that a society shares. It is very interesting to understand how people develop a culture because it seems to be a purely social phenomenon developed by a group of people and then spread among other individuals who somehow relate to that particular group.

As an example, communist countries have very different cultures. They vividly illustrate how a group of people can influence a culture. China was not always a communist country. Long before communists came to power the population of the country shared a different ideology. The communist government directly influenced the country’s culture by the means of propaganda, the education system, television etc. Subsequently, the next generation is going to absorb the culture modified by communism whereas the previous generation is not so likely to accept it. However, even though communists altered people’s views and beliefs they could not completely eradicate most of the traditions shared by the society (Henry Rosemont, 1981).

There are many numerous differences between human beings and animals. Even though humans as well as animals are very complex creatures that have very complicated biological and chemical processes going on in their bodies, humans are more complex creatures because there is a great deal of social interaction that implies relationships, mental processes, human behavior, etc. Social sciences are several related fields that basically study the interaction among human beings. This field is very broad because the social activities that human beings involve in are so numerous that it would be hard to expound all the phenomena that cannot be explained by natural sciences in one discipline.

The social sciences include anthropology, sociology, political science, economics, law, psychology, criminology and social psychology. All these sciences are very important because they make an attempt to explain why people act they way they do, why they interact with others, and why they form a global society. Actually these disciplines cover a lot more social issues that directly relate to the behavior of people. The difference between the social sciences and the natural sciences lies in the fact that the natural sciences like physics, mathematics, biology and chemistry study the processes and objects that can be physically measures in terms of weight, speed, or other measurements. Social sciences deal with more subtle social processes and phenomena that cannot be measured exactly but can only be pondered and theorized about (Encyclopedia Britannica).

Anthropology is a very diverse and broad discipline that primarily deals with questions like what people think, what they do, why they interact with each other, and how they evolved over the course of time . Mostly, anthropologists deal with very basic questions but it is the simplicity that gives way to more complex phenomena. This discipline also studies how people can adopt to various cultural environments and how the cultures were formed. Ultimately, the purpose of this science is to understand the human life. Anthropology contains three main components that are employed by scientists to unravel the mysteries of the human race. They are society, culture, and evolution. Society and culture are the terms that are often confused and used interchangeably.

The basic definition of society can be found in biology where a herd of horses for example is referred to as society. However, society in the anthropological sense is used in reference to humans who can form a society of several billions of people who share the same culture. Culture, on the other hand, is a set of rules, customs, traditions that people live in accordance with. A society that shares the same set of social rules can be called a culture. Therefore, there is very subtle difference between the two terms and most of the time they can be used interchangeably due to the great deal of similarity. There are several elements that constitute a culture.

First of all, people who form a culture speak the same language, and employ other means of communicating complex ideas such as art, literature, cinema, etc. Thus a culture can be passed from generation to generation. Evolution is a radically different approach and it aims at the evolution of human beings over time. There are numerous theories that try to examine the process of evolution but most of them are questionable. As a separate discipline anthropology consists of several fields that include cultural anthropology that studies the elements that constitute a culture and what role cultures play in the world today; linguistic anthropology that focuses on the role of the language in the society; archaeology that studies the ancient societies, the cultures of the past and the effect they have on the present-day world; and physical anthropology that focuses on the evolution of human beings in terms of biological and physiological aspects.

Physical anthropology is similar to archaeology in the sense that both study the evolution. However, physical anthropology focuses on the physical changes that presumably occurred in the human bodies over time whereas archaeology emphasizes the cultural aspects of evolution. As you can see, anthropology is a very broad field and it is closely related to some other social disciplines (Encyclopedia Britannica).

Another very important component that I believe influences the formation of a particular culture is mythology that relates to the people of that culture. Mythology is virtually a set of myths that originated in a culture and were spread around by people. Thereafter, this set of myths became traditions and cultural beliefs that are share by the people of that culture. A myth can be classified as a narrative or a tale that has been passed from one generation to another by word of mouth. This process of retelling keeps going up to the point when it is hard to distinguish between a tale and a true story.

Myths usually get accepted by the culture as a custom or a tradition and when this happens it is hard to tell a myth from reality. Most of the time, people involuntarily believe that the myths that happened to originate a long time ago constitute the foundation of their culture (E. Evans, 1983). Myths are universal, occurring in almost all cultures. They typically date from a time before the introduction of writing, when they were passed orally from one generation to the next. Myths deal with basic questions about the nature of the world and human experience, and because of their all-encompassing nature, myths can illuminate many aspects of a culture. Although it is difficult to draw rigid distinctions among various types of traditional tales, people who study mythology find it useful to categorize them.

The three most common types of tales are sagas, legends, and folktales. When a tale is based on a great historical (or supposedly historical) event, it is generally known as a saga. Despite a saga’s basis in very distant historical events, its dramatic structure and characters are the product of storytellers’ imaginations. A legend is a fictional story associated with a historical person or place. Legends often provide examples of the virtues of honored figures in the history of a group or nation. The traditional American story about young George Washington and the cherry tree–in which he could not lie about chopping it down–is best described as a legend, because George Washington is a historical figure but the story about the cherry tree is recognized today as fictional. Folktales, a third variety of traditional tale, are usually simple narratives of adventure built around elements of character and plot–for example, the young man who slays a monster and wins the hand of a princess. Folktales may contain a moral or observation about life, but their chief purpose is entertainment (E. Evans, 1983).

Myths may include features of sagas, legends, and folktales. What makes one of these tales a myth is its serious purpose and its importance to the culture. Experts usually define a myth as a story that has compelling drama and deals with basic elements and assumptions of a culture. Myths explain, for example, how the world began; how humans and animals came into being; how certain customs, gestures, or forms of human activity originated; and how the divine and human worlds interact. Many myths take place at a time before the world as human beings know it came into being. Because myth-making often involves gods, other supernatural beings, and processes beyond human understanding, some scholars have viewed it as a dimension of religion. However, many myths address topics that are not typically considered religious–for example, why features of the landscape take a certain shape (Encyclopedia Britannica, 2002, Deluxe Edition).

The key character of Chinese mythology is monkey. He is a god-hero who is the cornerstone of ancient China’s mythology (Henry Rosemont, 1981). Based on what is said in the legends, monkey was born from a stone egg that was created from a rock as old as time and included the essence of the Earth and Heaven. Monkey was endowed with a magical staff that could shrink or grow to any size. Also this hero had other magical abilities. For example there is a famous picture in Chinese mythology where the monkey creates an army out of his fur blowing it into the air.

Subsequently, this clever creature creates a monkey warrior out of every single hair. Monkey defied the supreme god of Chinese mythology, the Jade Emperor, with his own claim as high god. To appease the mischievous Monkey, the Jade Emperor proclaimed him King of Heaven, concealing the fact that he had only made him a heavenly stable keeper. Monkey discovered this deception and, enraged, returned to Earth to wreak havoc. The Jade Emperor entreated Buddha for help. Buddha dropped a mountain on Monkey, and Monkey remained beneath it for 500 years. On his journey from China to India to retrieve Buddhist scriptures, the monk Tripitaka unearthed Monkey, who became Tripitaka’s escort and disciple. With two other companions, Piggy and Sandy, both exofficials of the Heavenly Court reborn in monstrous bodies, Monkey accompanied the monk for 14 years, covering nine kingdoms and encountering numerous fantastic adventures. After presenting the scriptures Tripitaka had obtained in India to the Chinese emperor in the imperial capital of Chang-an, the four travelers were borne up to heaven. Monkey, with his irrepressible spirit and countless magic tricks, is generally regarded as a personification of the nature of genius (Encyclopedia Britannica).

Culture is basically the patterns of behavior and thinking that people living in social groups learn, create, and share. Culture distinguishes one human group from others. It also distinguishes humans from other animals. A people’s culture includes their beliefs, rules of behavior, language, rituals, art, technology, styles of dress, ways of producing and cooking food, religion, and political and economic systems (E. Evans, 1983). Culture is the most important concept in anthropology – the study of all aspects of human life, past and present. Anthropologists commonly use the term culture to refer to a society or group in which many or all people live and think in the same ways.

Likewise, any group of people who share a common culture–and in particular, common rules of behavior and a basic form of social organization–constitutes a society. Thus, the terms culture and society are somewhat interchangeable. However, while many animals live in societies, such as herds of elk or packs of wild dogs, only humans have culture. Culture developed together with the evolution of the human species, Homo sapiens, and is closely related to human biology. The ability of people to have culture comes in large part from their physical features: having big, complex brains; an upright posture; free hands that can grasp and manipulate small objects; and a vocal tract that can produce and articulate a wide range of sounds (Encyclopedia Britannica, 2002 Deluxe Edition). These distinctively human physical features began to develop in African ancestors of humans more than four million years ago.

The earliest physical evidence of culture is crude stone tools produced in East Africa over two million years ago. People have culture primarily because they can communicate with and understand symbols. Symbols allow people to develop complex thoughts and to exchange those thoughts with others. Language and other forms of symbolic communication, such as art, enable people to create, explain, and record new ideas and information. Symbols allow people to develop complex thoughts and exchange those thoughts with others (E. Evans, 1983). A symbol has either an indirect connection or no connection at all with the object, idea, feeling, or behavior to which it refers.

For instance, most people in the United States find some meaning in the combination of the colors red, white, and blue. But those colors themselves have nothing to do with, for instance, the land that people call the United States, the concept of patriotism, or the U.S. national anthem, The Star Spangled Banner. To convey new ideas, people constantly invent new symbols, such as for mathematical formulas (E. Evans, 1983). In addition, people may use one symbol, such as a single word, to represent many different ideas, feelings, or values. Thus, symbols provide a flexible way for people to communicate even very complex thoughts with each other. For example, only through symbols can architects, engineers, and construction workers communicate the information necessary to construct a skyscraper or bridge. People have the capacity at birth to construct, understand, and communicate through symbols, primarily by using language.

Research has shown, for example, that infants have a basic structure of language–a sort of universal grammar–built into their minds. Infants are thus predisposed to learn the languages spoken by the people around them. Language provides a means to store, process, and communicate amounts of information that vastly exceed the capabilities of nonhuman animals. For instance, chimpanzees, the closest genetic relatives of humans, use a few dozen calls and a variety of gestures to communicate in the wild. People have taught some chimps to communicate using American Sign Language and picture-based languages, and some have developed vocabularies of a few hundred words. But an unabridged English dictionary might contain more than half-a-million vocabulary entries. Chimpanzees have also not clearly demonstrated the ability to use grammar, which is crucial for communicating complex thoughts. In addition, the human vocal tract, unlike that of chimpanzees and other animals, can create and articulate a wide enough variety of sounds to create millions of distinct words.

In fact, each human language uses only a fraction of the sounds humans can make. The human brain also contains areas dedicated to the production and interpretation of speech, which other animals lack. Thus, humans are predisposed in many ways to use symbolic communication. People are not born with culture; they have to learn it. For instance, people must learn to speak and understand a language and to abide by the rules of a society. In many societies, all people must learn to produce and prepare food and to construct shelters. In other societies, people must learn a skill to earn money, which they then use to provide for themselves. In all human societies, children learn culture from adults.

Anthropologists call this process enculturation, or cultural transmission. Enculturation is a long process. Just learning the intricacies of a human language, a major part of enculturation, takes many years. Families commonly protect and enculturate children in the households of their birth for 15 years or more (Encyclopedia Britannica). Only at this point can children leave and establish their own households. People also continue to learn throughout their lifetimes. Thus, most societies respect their elders, who have learned for an entire lifetime. Humans are not alone in their ability to learn behaviors, only in the amount and complexity of what they can learn.

For example, members of a group of chimpanzees may learn to use a unique source of food or to fashion some simple tools, behaviors that might distinguish them from other chimpanzee groups. But these unique ways of life are minor in comparison to the rich cultures that distinguish different human societies. Lacking speech, chimps are very limited in what they can learn, communicate to others, and pass on from generation to generation.

People living together in a society share culture. For example, almost all people living in the United States share the English language, dress in similar styles, eat many of the same foods, and celebrate many of the same holidays. All the people of a society collectively create and maintain culture. Societies preserve culture for much longer than the life of any one person. They preserve it in the form of knowledge, such as scientific discoveries; objects, such as works of art; and traditions, such as the observance of holidays.

As it was pointed out mythology plays a vital role in the development of a culture. The tales and sagas that originated in a particular culture are adopted as beliefs and traditions that in turn form a cultural foundation that people adhere to. It is not only traditions that constitute a cultural barrier that interferes with the mutual understanding among cultures. People in China were able to develop different traditions and customs partly because they inhabited a different geographical area and were not influenced by the American culture. There are things that can only be understood by people who live in a particular area. Furthermore when the representatives of a particular culture confront people from another culture there is a great deal of misunderstanding between them. Using the sociological terminology, it can be classified as a cultural clash. Such a cultural clash happens whenever people from two different cultures attempt to communicate an idea not taking into account the cultural differences that exist between them.

Bibliography

Chinese Language, Chinese Philosophy, and Truth. Journal of Asian Studies 44:3 (May 1985), pp. 491-519

Encyclopedia Britannica 2002 Deluxe Edition.

Edward Evans. Understanding and interpreting cultures. New York: Random House, 1983.

Henry Rosemont. Studies in Classical Chinese Thought. Atlanta: Scholars Press, 1981.

Lisa A. Raphals. Sharing the Light : Representations of Women and Virtue in Early China. Albany, NY: SUNY Press, 1998.

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The Power Of Poetry In Your Next Speech

River Wharfe - Wharfedale

If you want to add some class to your next speech, if you are looking for a way to make your audience come to tears or break out in laughter, then sometimes what you need to do is to incorporate some poetry into your speech. I'm not talking the "Roses are red, Violets are blue …" variety, but rather poems that really mean something and which can lend their weight to your speech.

Just What Is This Thing Called Poetry?

Just in case you've been out of school for just a bit too long, maybe we should take a step back and make sure that we're all on the same page when it comes to this poetry thing. The good folks over at Wikipedia seem to have a pretty good handle on it when they define poetry as being a:

"Literary work in which special intensity is given to the expression of feelings and ideas by the use of distinctive style and rhythm …"

We all know about the importance of public speaking and poetry is yet another way to get our points across. Because of the way that the words are put together in a poem, they can easily flow off of your tongue and into your audience's mind. When your audience hears a line of poetry, they process it differently from everything else that you've been saying. It can almost immediately cause a reaction to occur in your audience.

The poems that we have all heard were written by famous, what else, poets. What this means is that when you add their poetry to your speech you'll also be adding a new level of importance to what you are saying.

What's The Best Way To Use A Poem In Your Next Speech?

The power of poetry is something that you can add to your next speech in order to make sure that your speech makes an impression on your audience. Celia Berrell writes a lot of poetry and she points out that you can not add an inspiration poem to your speech, instead you'll have to add just pieces and parts.

When you reach the point in your speech that you'll start to recite the part of the poem that you've selected, you'll find that you now have a license to do more. You can use more gestures and you can use more vocal variety to convey your message. You audience's listening skills will be peaked because hearing poetry is not something that they do every day. It's poetry so people expect you to act like a poet while you are reciting the poem.

The power of a poem comes from the specific words that make it up as well as the sequence in which they flow. In terms of presentation tips, you've just got some memorization to do here. On top of that you'll need to take the time to practice, practice, practice. Reading poetry is probably not something that you do every day and so you are going to have to invest the time and energy that it's going to take so that when you recite the poem, it sounds natural.

Finally, Celia makes a good point when she points out that just like you, your audience probably doesnt encounter poetry every day. Therefore you can not just hit them over the head with a poem right off the bat in your speech. Instead, you need to take the time to introduce both the poem and the poet. Give some backstory on when and why the poem was written. Tell them what the meaning of the poem is before you share the actual poem with them. By doing this you'll prepare them to be wowed by the words of the poem.

What Does All Of This Mean For You

Even the most unread among us has heard some poetry at some point in our lives. The people who write the classic poems really know how to use words to create lyrical phrases that stimulate the memory and generate deep feelings.

Your next speech can tap into the power of poetry if you'll just take the time to work some poetry into it. Take the time to prepare your audience for the poem that you'll be sharing with them and then keep it short and to the point. Taking the time to carefully practice your delivery will allow you to ensure that the poem makes a lasting impression.

The goal of every speech is to make a lasting impression on your audience. The poet Mary Elizabeth Coleridge knew how hard it was to tap into an audience's memory when she wrote:

Strange Power, I know not what thou art,
Murderer or mistress of my heart.
I know I'd rather meet the blow
Of my most unrelenting foe
Than live-as now I live-to be
Slain twenty times a day by the.

Take the time to work some poetry into your next speech and you'll have found a way to make a lasting impression on your audience.

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Club Penguin – Famous Penguins

Belmont House

In the gaming, snow covered world of Club Penguin, the residents are all penguins. These penguins live like real people, they have parties, they earn money, and they live in igloos and decorate their homes too. Since there are such similarities to real life, in the Club Penguin world there are celebrities too who are living amongst them.

These "famous penguins" can not be visited by all the other resident penguins. Only the moderators know where they stay. One famous group of penguins is "The Team". They are the original or the first moderators. They are Billybob, Happy77, Gizmo, Rsnail and Screenhog.

Billybob now writes the blog and also lets penguins know about the upcoming events. Happy77's profile is used as a model to other penguins to show what a moderators profile looks like. Gizmo's job includes taking care of all the parties. The servers and the technical side is looked after by Rsnail. The job of Screenhog is to design other penguins.

Another famous penguin in this world is Rockhopper. He is a pirate and visits this land once in 2 months aboard his ship called The Migrator. When he comes penguins are allowed to board his ship and buy some of the strange contents including a diary of Rockhopper's adventures. This penguin is a lot bigger than the normal penguins and is also dressed like pirates. Pirate clothes are unavailable to others.

One of the most famous set or group of penguins is the Band. The Band, a group of four musicians, attests all the big parties and events that take place at Club Penguin. The band has evolved from what it was in the beginning when the Club was a new concept. There is a drummer, an acoustic guitarist, a bass guitarist and a pianist.

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